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Galleries at DeGolyer Barbara Bigham, Mari Epperson, Kaki Hopkins, Sharon Ballew

On April 23, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden held a reception for sponsors and special guests to get a sneak peek at the ‘Galleries at DeGolyer,’ a new area of the Artscape festival, before this juried fine art and fine craft show and sale opened over the weekend.

 

Set up in the historic DeGolyer House, Galleries at DeGolyer is a curated area featuring select works from the following galleries:

  • Afterimage Gallery
  • Alan Barnes Fine Art
  • Dian Malouf
  • David Dike Fine Art
  • Riddell Rare Maps & Fine Prints
  • Southwest Gallery
  • Samuel Lynne Gallery featuring J.D. Miller
  • Dutch Art Gallery

 

Artscape featured more than 90 outstanding artists from around the country showcase their art in the garden including 46 new artists showcasing painting, sculpture, photography, jewelry, glass and more. Named by Architectural Digest as one of the "15 Most Breathtaking Botanical Gardens to Visit This Season,” the Dallas Arboretum is a perfect complement to the beautiful artwork selected for the show. In addition to art, the festival included live music, a university zone, adult beverages, food concessions, packaged treats and a Children’s Art Escape. 

 

The Artscape co-chairs were Dallas Arboretum volunteers and community leaders, Sharon Ballew and Mari Epperson.

 

A special thanks to the 2019 Artscape Sponsors:

Graff Chevrolet, Automobile Sponsor

BNSF, Boulevard Sponsor

Mari and Don Epperson and Sharon and Maurice Ballew, Picnic Area Sponsor

JHP Architecture and Urban Design, Entertainment Sponsor

Accurate Signs, Entertainment Sponsor

Olmsted-Taylor Foundation, Children’s Art Escape

Joe Buskuhl, Artist Concierge Tent

Mary Spencer – University Booth Sponsor

RLG Consulting Engineers, Street Sponsor

Michael and Wendy Jenkins – Street Sponsor

Sandra Estess

 

In addition to Artscape, guests enjoyed the newest summer exhibit, “Celebrate the Children,” created by acclaimed sculptor Gary Lee Price, which is on display through October 15. The collection features more than 25 different, hand-produced, bronze sculptures of children playfully interacting. The “Celebrate the Children” exhibition, presented by Reliant, is also supported by the Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District.

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 2-12 and free for Arboretum members and children under two. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $9. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

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On April 27 and April 28, the Dallas Arboretum presents Artscape, a juried fine art and fine craft show and sale, where more than 90 outstanding artists from around the country showcase their art in the garden.

 

This year, Artscape features 46 new artists and a variety of mediums including painting, sculpture, photography, jewelry, glass and more. The layout for the art fair is architect-designed for maximum visibility of artists and audience flow. Named by Architectural Digest as one of the "15 Most Breathtaking Botanical Gardens to Visit This Season,” the Dallas Arboretum is a perfect complement to the beautiful artwork selected for the show.

 

The Artscape co-chairs are Dallas Arboretum volunteers and community leaders, Sharon Ballew and Mari Epperson. Ballew said, “With the garden in bloom for spring, Artscape has become one of the best art festivals to attend in the area with some of the finest artists showcasing their work.”

Artscape has something for everyone:

92 Artists & 12 Mediums:

Watercolor, 2D Mixed Media, Painting, Ceramics, Fiber, Glass, Drawing/Pastel, 3D Mixed Media, Photography, Sculpture, Wood and Jewelry.

 

Galleries Represented:

Afterimage, Alan Barnes, Dian Malouf, David Dike, Riddell Rare Maps, Southwest Gallery, Samuel Lynn and Dutch Art Gallery.

 

Live Music:

Saturday, April 27

9-11 a.m.-Tomas Sclar

12-2 p.m.-Hello Shannon

3-5 p.m.-Mountain Natives

 

Sunday, April 28

9-11 a.m.-Dallas Unity String Orchestra

12-2 p.m.-The Gibbonses

3-5 p.m.-Bridge the Gap

 

Dallas County Community College District Art Department Demonstrations and Sale:

Saturday, April 27: North Lake, Cedar Valley and El Centro

Sunday, April 28: North Lake

 

A Children’s Art Escape: This booth features hands-on art activities for the young to make and take, overseen by retired DISD art teachers.

Craft Beers:

Saturday, April 27, 12-4 p.m.: Austin East Ciders, Bishop Cider, Texas Ale Project

Sunday, April 28, 12-4 p.m.: Celestial Beer Works, Pegasus City Beer

 

Concessions: Smoky Rose, Ziziki’s, Empanada Cookhouse, Chick-fil-A, Fletch Concessions, Gils Bar, Greenville Ave Pizza Co.

Local Bites: Baldo’s Ice Cream, Pajama Sweets, North Texas Wildflower Honey, One Day Bakery, Steel City Pops, Snow Baby Ice, White Rock Granola

See a full list of artists attending. To learn more, visit the Artscape website. Artscape is free with paid garden admission.

 

2019 Artscape Sponsors:

BNSF, Boulevard Sponsor

Mary Spencer, Boulevard Sponsor

Mari and Don Epperson, Picnic Area Sponsor

Graff Chevrolet, Automobile Sponsor

JHP Architecture and Urban Design, Entertainment Stage Sponsor

Accurate Signs, Entertainment Sponsor

Olmsted-Taylor Foundation, Children’s Art Escape

Joe Buskuhl, Artist Concierge Tent

RLG Consulting Engineers, Street Sponsor

Sharon and Maurice Ballew

Sandra Estess

 

In addition to Artscape, guests will be able to enjoy the newest summer exhibit, “Celebrate the Children,” created by acclaimed sculptor Gary Lee Price, which is on display through October 15. The exhibit features more than 25 different, hand-produced, bronze sculptures of children playfully interacting. The exhibit, presented by Reliant, is a part of Summer at the Arboretum.

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 2-12 and free for Arboretum members and children under two. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $9. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

 

 

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Dallas Arboretum Greenhouse

Every great botanic garden needs an outstanding greenhouse facility to establish and acclimate the many varieties of plants, florals and vegetables it plants. For more than a decade, the Dallas Arboretum searched for appropriate land and greenhouse space, and in 2017 found it just seven miles away on an eight-acre parcel that straddles Dallas and Mesquite.  After preparing the land and installing approximately 17,000 square feet of climate-controlled greenhouses, the Dallas Arboretum is now ready to dedicate the space at a private event on April 3 at 2 p.m. (press is welcome to attend with RSVP).

 

According to Dallas Arboretum Board Chairman Alan Walne, “Owning our greenhouses allows us to grow many small batches of unique specimens our guests look forward to seeing in the gardens. We can now cost-effectively grow 60 percent of the plant specimens used in our gardens. With installation of the first greenhouses, we have achieved a major goal of our master plan and protected ourselves for the future.” 

 

The land was acquired in 2017, and the greenhouses were built in 2018, through the support of generous sponsors, including Phyllis and Tom McCasland, the Jeanne R. Johnson Foundation and the Hoblitzelle Foundation.  The Horticulture staff moved onsite in November 2018 and started producing in December 2018.

 

Mary Brinegar, Dallas Arboretum president and CEO, said, “This facility is a game changer. Tom and Phyllis are among the most generous supporters of the Dallas Arboretum—from seed money for the Chihuly exhibition, the impetus behind The 12 Days of Christmas celebration and the renovation and permanent site of the sunken garden. They provided the money for the land purchase for these greenhouses, paid for fencing, security, utilities, communications and a portion of the greenhouses with a challenge grant to encourage others to complete the greenhouse construction as it is today. The McCaslands ask for no publicity, but our Executive Committee voted to name the Horticulture Center and acreage in honor of them as a tribute to their generosity.”

 

Jenny Wegley, Dallas Arboretum vice president of horticulture, said, “These greenhouses have tripled how many high-quality plants we can grow and that our visitors have come to expect. Before, we had limited capacity at the Arboretum and another facility. We’re now able to grow different varieties of plants, larger and better quality produce for A Tasteful Place, and a variety of cereal plants (i.e., wheat, oat, rice, etc.) for our Incredible Edible Garden in the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden.”

 

One highlight of the Horticulture Center is the new technology incorporated into the greenhouses. Called the Wadsworth Control System, this system operates the greenhouse at the touch of a screen, increasing the quality of plants grown.  Ana Swinson, Dallas Arboretum greenhouse manager, said “This new technology is a first for us, and it’s helped us become better growers.”

 

Swinson and other staff can regulate the following functions right from a tablet screen:

  • Temperature: ability to heat or cool the greenhouse via heaters
  • Irrigation: how much water to use for various plants
  • Humidity: ability to control the percentage of humidity based on plants’ needs
  • Lighting/Automatic Shade: An automatic fabric shade uses less labor than when the staff had to manually cover and uncover plants. Shades are also used for heat retention in the winter/early spring. In the summertime, using the shade helps keep the greenhouse cool for Horticulture staff and volunteers working.
  • Pad pumps.

 

Swinson added, “In addition to being able to control many functions, the system provides us with information to monitor how the greenhouses are working and send this information to a computer. If I have a successful grow one season, I can reestablish my greenhouse for the following season using the same variables. This technology allows us to grow, control and see what we’re doing and how we impact what we’re growing. Plus, a controlled environment is more predictable than being outside in the elements.”

 

Speaking of elements, the plant cuttings have a process for making it outside:

  1. Staff plants cuttings in large trays until the root systems are developed.
  2. Once root systems develop, plans are transplanted to pots until they reach the appropriate size.
  3. Once at the right size with a solid root system, the plants are carried to the outside gardens, where they’re acclimated.
  4. Once acclimated, those plants are transplanted into the Dallas Arboretum.

 

Wegley added, “Our biggest asset is climate control in the greenhouse, so now we can inspect our plants more carefully, an important part of what we do. Now we can step back and look at our plants, how we’re growing them and the quality of what’s being produced. These greenhouses give us the ability to do it accurately and precisely.”  

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Dallas Arboretum Food & Wine

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden hosts its third annual Food and Wine Festival, expanding it to a three-day celebration from March 21 to 23 during the popular springtime festival, Dallas Blooms. The event kicks off with A Grand Tasting on Thursday, March 21 featuring a revamped patron experience with dozens of notable Metroplex chefs, their signature tastings and an amazing selection of wine and beer. On Friday, March 22, the festival features master classes in A Tasteful Place during the day, followed by an intimate Vintners’ Dinner that evening. On Saturday, March 23, Farmer Lee Jones, founder of The Chef’s Garden® in Ohio, premieres The Chef's Garden's® Roots on the Road conference for the first time ever outside his home state.

Jones serves as the Honorary Farmer Chair for the weekend. Melissa Lewis is the event chair, and Chef Sharon Van Meter is the chef chair. Friday’s Vintners’ Dinner chair is Barbara Bigham, and committee members include Nikki Beneke, Robin Norcross, Dyann Skelton, Venise Stuart and Joan Walne.

According to Dallas Arboretum Board Chairman Alan Walne, “Thanks to our friend and Chef Chair Sharon Van Meter and everyone who helped, the Dallas Arboretum has had two successful Food & Wine Festivals. Chef Sharon had met Farmer Lee Jones when she attended his Roots conference, and she suggested that we add culinary and food education to our festival. Now that we have our newest garden that teaches visitors how to grow, harvest and prepare fresh food, this conference complements the culinary-filled weekend.”

A sell out the last two years, Thursday evening’s A Grand Tasting features 40 of the region’s top chefs, an amazing selection of wine and beer and the wonderful springtime garden—perfect for any foodie. Guests can stroll through the garden, revel in more than 500,000 spring blooming bulbs, while treating their taste buds to the best food and wine. The revamped patron experience allows guests to access the festival one hour before it opens to the general public, complimentary valet parking, and an entrance reception hosted by Honorary Farmer Lee Jones. The patron experience begins at 6 p.m. and includes valet parking and special entrance into A Tasteful Place. General admission starts at 7 p.m., and the evening ends at 10 p.m. Patron tickets are $250 (limited availability), and general admission tickets are $150.

On Friday, two well-regarded chefs offer a class and a demonstration, both taking place at the Dallas Arboretum’s A Tasteful Place pavilion:

10:00 a.m.-Noon-Peter Barlow, executive chef/partner of Niteshade Chef Collaborative and opening chef de cuisine of Dallas’ only five-star restaurant, Stephan Pyles Flora Street Café, teaches “Prelude to Waste Not,” Roots: Turning Leftovers into Lunch.” Cost is $65, and registration is required at www.dallasarboretum.org/foodwinefest.

1:00-3:00 p.m.- Mary Chamberlin, acclaimed chef and cookbook author, brings her authentic taste of great recipes to demonstrate how to prepare Asparagus Soup with Crab Cakes, Hot Tamale Soup, and Quickie Chickie Vegetable Soup. The demonstration is free with paid garden admission.

On Friday night, guests can indulge in this unique culinary experience with a five-course dinner at the Vintners’ Dinner from one of Dallas’ top chefs, while getting to interact and sip exclusive wine in A Tasteful Place, the most picturesque place to watch the downtown Dallas skyline at sunset. This dinner is a truly exclusive opportunity any food and wine enthusiast would relish. Ten chefs prepare a magnificent meal for a table, and vintners expertly pair fine wines to go along with each course. Guests also receive complimentary valet parking and the opportunity to mingle with each table’s chef and vintner. Semi-formal dress is encouraged, and seating is limited. Cocktails start at 6:00 p.m., followed by dinner. Tickets are $500 per guest or $5,000 for a table of 10, and $7,500 for a corporate table of 10. For more information, contact Kristi Trail at ktrail@dallasarboretum.org or 214-515-6524.

Thanks to the partnership with The Chef’s Garden® and Farmer Lee Jones, guests have the opportunity to experience The Chef's Garden's Roots on the Road on Saturday, March 23. The Chef’s Garden holds its annual conference at the Culinary Vegetable Institute in Milan, Ohio, where culinary influencers and industry professionals learn and share ways to cultivate change and solutions in their industry. Making its way to Dallas for the first-time ever, the conference includes four interactive panels. The Roots conference runs from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. The day concludes with a seasonal farm-to-table dinner, prepared from fresh, local grown produce starting at 5:30 p.m. with cocktails. A ticket for the workshop and dinner is $225. A dinner-only ticket is $125.

The Chef's Garden's Roots on the Road Schedule:

9:30-10:30 a.m.

Coffee & Noshes – Sponsorship by local coffee and Katherine Clapner Kolaches

Farmers Market – Produce from 1st panel farms

 

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

Farms: Big & Small, How can we help each other?

Moderated by Farmer Lee Jones

Farms:

-Daron Babcock, Bonton Farms

-Jeff Bedner, Profound Microfarms

-Nelson Carter, Cartermere Farms

-Elizabeth Dry, POP/La Bajada Urban Youth Farms

-Sofia Martinez, Rae Lili Farm

 

12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m. – Box Lunch

Work-Life Balance Panel

Moderated by Chef Mathew Peters, first American to win the coveted Bocuse d’Or award

-Junior Borges

-Lisa Lavender, The Lisa Lavender

-Nikky Phinyawatana, Asian Mint

-Lisa Welch, Make Ready Experience

 

 2:15-3:45 p.m.

How Can Green be Greener? Guide to better practices in a reusable world

Moderated by Chef Sharon Van Meter and presented by EarthxTaste

-Lauren Clarke, Turn Compost

-Bob Curry, City of Dallas

-Kelly Freeman

-Jessie Zarazaga, Southern Methodist University

  

4:00-5:30 p.m.

Food Trends to Watch in 2019

Moderated by Beth Rankin, The Dallas Observer

-Randy DeWitt, Front Burner Restaurants

-Roger Kaplan, RK Innovation

-Mariam Parker, Austin Food & Wine Alliance

-Whole Foods Market

 

Dinner: Waste Not, Want Not Dinner

5:30 p.m. Cocktails

6:30 p.m. Dinner

Lead Chef: Peter Barlow, Niteshade Chef Collaborative

Chef Jamie Simpson, The Culinary Vegetable Institute at The Chef’s Garden

Chef Junior Borges

Chef Katherine Clapner, Dude Sweet Chocolate

Chef Graham Dodds

Chef Josh Harmon, The Belmont Room

Chef Jeffery Hobbs, Slow Bone

Chef Chad Houser, Café Momentum

Chef Sean Jett, Humble Pies

Chef Robert Lyford, Patina Green Inc.

Chef Andrea Shackelford, Harvest Seasonal Kitchen

Chef David Anthony Temple, Chef DAT LTD

 

Farmer Jones added, “Roots on the Road is an opportunity to extend the conversations we started at Roots Cultivate 2018 at The Culinary Vegetable Institute. Sharing knowledge and expanding awareness in and around the food industry is a serious responsibility, and this is a great outlet to accomplish that. The more Roots, the merrier!”  

For more information, a list of chefs or to purchase tickets, visit www.dallasarboretum.org/foodwinefest.

Themed Life's A Picnic, Dallas Blooms, presented by IBERIABANK, features more than 500,000 spring blooming bulbs and is one of the "15 Breathtaking Botanical Gardens to Visit This Season," according to Architectural Digest. 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. From January 2-31, general garden admission is $5. The Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden is closed through February 22 for preventative maintenance. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. General admission is $17 for adults, $14 for seniors 65 and older, $12 for children 2-12 during the Dallas Blooms Festival (Feb. 23-Apr. 7), and free for Arboretum members and children under two. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

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Chef Farmer Lee Jones

Farmer Lee Jones, founder of The Chef’s Garden® in Ohio, premieres The Chef's Garden's® Roots on the Road conference for the first time ever outside his home state at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden on Saturday, March 23.

This culinary event is the last day of the Food and Wine Festival, which runs March 21 to 23. Jones serves as the Honorary Farmer Chair, Chef Sharon Van Meter is the chef chair, and Melissa Lewis is the event chair.

The Roots conference runs from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. The day concludes with a seasonal farm-to-table dinner, prepared from fresh, local grown produce starting at 5:30 p.m. with cocktails. A ticket for the workshop and dinner is $225.A dinner-only ticket is $125. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.dallasarboretum.org/foodwinefest.

Chef Sharon Van Meter said, “If you’re in the food industry—whether you’re a chef, a restaurateur, a farmer, a supplier or a foodie, this is a must-attend event for you. You’ll learn about what’s trending in sustainable food, meet large and small farmers, network with the who’s who in the industry, and sample an incredible meal at the ‘Waste Not, Want Not,’ dinner that evening!”

The Chef’s Gardenholds its annual conference at the Culinary Vegetable Institute in Milan, Ohio, where culinary influencers and industry professionals learn and share ways to cultivate change and solutions in their industry. Thanks to the partnership with The Chef’s Garden® and Farmer Lee Jones, guests have the opportunity to experience The Chef's Garden's Roots on the Road at A Tasteful Place, the Dallas Arboretum’s newest garden dedicated to growing, harvesting and preparing vegetables, herbs and fruit.

The Chef's Garden's Roots on the Road Schedule:

9:30-10:30 a.m.

Coffee & Noshes – Sponsorship by local coffee and Katherine Clapner Kolaches

Farmers Market – Produce from 1st panel farms

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

Farms: Big & Small, How can we help each other?

Moderated by Farmer Lee Jones

Farms:

-Daron Babcock, Bonton Farms

-Jeff Bednar, Profound Microfarms

-Nelson Carter, Cartermere Farms

-Elizabeth Dry, POP/La Bajada Urban Youth Farms

-Sofia Martinez, Rae Lili Farm

12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m. – Box Lunch

Work-Life Balance Panel

Moderated by Chef Mathew Peters, first American to win the coveted Bocuse d’Or award

-Junior Borges

-Lisa Lavender, The Lisa Lavender

-Nikky Phinyawatana, Asian Mint

-Lisa Welch, Make Ready Experience

2:15-3:45 p.m.

How Can Green be Greener? Guide to better practices in a reusable world

Moderated by Chef Sharon Van Meter and presented by EarthxTaste

-Lauren Clarke, Turn Compost

-Bob Curry, City of Dallas

-Kelly Freeman

-Jessie Zarazaga, Southern Methodist University

4:00-5:30 p.m.

Food Trends to Watch in 2019

Moderated by Beth Rankin, The Dallas Observer

-Randy DeWitt, Front Burner Restaurants

-Roger Kaplan, RK Innovation

-Mariam Parker, Austin Food & Wine Alliance

-Ron Ruggless, Nation's Restaurant News

Dinner: Waste Not, Want Not Dinner

5:30 p.m. Cocktails

6:30 p.m. Dinner

Lead Chef: Peter Barlow, Niteshade Chef Collaborative

Chef Jamie Simpson, The Culinary Vegetable Institute at The Chef’s Garden

Chef Junior Borges

Chef Katherine Clapner, Dude Sweet Chocolate

Chef Graham Dodds

Chef Josh Harmon, The Belmont Room

Chef Jeffery Hobbs, Slow Bone

Chef Chad Houser, Café Momentum

Chef Sean Jett, Humble Pies

Chef Robert Lyford, Patina Green Inc.

Chef Andrea Shackelford, Harvest Seasonal Kitchen

Chef David Anthony Temple, Chef DAT LTD

Farmer Jones added, “Roots on the Road is an opportunity to extend the conversations we started at Roots Cultivate 2018 at The Culinary Vegetable Institute. Sharing knowledge and expanding awareness in and around the food industry is a serious responsibility, and this is a great outlet to accomplish that. The more Roots, the merrier!”  

Themed Life's A Picnic, Dallas Blooms, presented by IBERIABANK, features more than 500,000 spring blooming bulbs and is one of the "15 Breathtaking Botanical Gardens to Visit This Season," according to Architectural Digest. 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. From January 2-31, general garden admission is $5. The Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden is closed through February 22 for preventative maintenance. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. General admission is $17 for adults, $14 for seniors 65 and older, $12 for children 2-12 during the Dallas Blooms Festival (Feb. 23-Apr. 7), and free for Arboretum members and children under two. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

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Goundhog Day Celebration

Now that the Dallas Arboretum is preparing for Dallas Blooms, the Southwest’s largest floral festival, many are wondering when spring will arrive in 2019. What better way to find out than to bring in everybody’s favorite meteorologist, the groundhog! The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden will host its first Groundhog Day celebration on Saturday, February 2, 7:00 to 9:00 a.m., in its newest garden, A Tasteful Place, which overlooks White Rock Lake and the Dallas skyline. Those interested in joining the festivities and shadow-watching are welcome to attend the event for free with paid garden admission. General garden admission is $5 February 1 to 22.

Guests are invited and encouraged to wear any type of hat (Texas-style for Groundhog Day) for a hat contest. Materials will be provided on site, and attendees are welcome to further embellish their hats. At the end of the event, a hat contest winner will be announced and will receive a prize. 

Alan Walne, Dallas Arboretum chairman, said, “Being a botanical garden and outdoor venue that is open 362 days a year, the Dallas Arboretum revolves around the weather. That said, we want to know whether we’ll have an early spring, so our groundhog, affectionately named Arboretum Annie, will help us predict the weather.”

According to folklore, if a groundhog comes out of hiding and sees her shadow, she will be scared and run back inside, meaning six more weeks of winter. If she doesn’t see her shadow, spring arrives early, which for the Arboretum would be just in time for Dallas Blooms. Themed Life’s A Picnic, Dallas Blooms, presented by IBERIABANK, opens on February 23 and runs through April 7, 2019.

For Groundhog Day, guests are encouraged to come as early at 7 a.m. where there will be breakfast items and beverages available for sale. After the sun rises at approximately 7:22 a.m., Colleen Coyle, WFAA Channel 8 meteorologist and emcee, and Robin Carreker, Dallas Arboretum Public Events board chair, will release Arboretum Annie to see if she sees her shadow. After that, guests are welcome to take selfies with the famous groundhog, make groundhog crafts and watch the iconic “Groundhog Day” movie with Bill Murray.

Carreker said, “We invite schools and encourage teachers and parents to help children write and submit a proclamation for the event, just as the Inner Circle in Punxsutawney script one in a language known as ‘Groundhogs,’ whether he has seen his shadow or not. This proclamation is a contest for any children under 18 years old can participate in, and the selected one will be read that morning.” For those who would like to participate, up to 200 words can be sent to sjackson@dallasarboretum.org or sent to the Dallas Arboretum (8525 Garland Rd., Dallas, TX 75218). The deadline for submission is January 29, 2019. 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218. February 1-22, general garden admission is $5. The Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden is closed through February 22 for preventative maintenance. On-site parking is $15, or $9 if purchased in advance online. The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. It is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

 

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Nancy Pierce Nancy Pierce smells her roses one more time.

When Nancy Pierce’s parents suggested she take an aptitude test in college, she found out that she had strengths in horticulture. Although she had planted vegetables with her mother growing up, she eschewed that calling and apologized to her parents for wasting their money on the test. Rather, she pursued nursing and teaching as a career.  Little did she know that horticulture would in fact become a big part of her life.

In 1995, Nancy's husband, Robert, received a new job, so they moved to Valdosta, Georgia, a small southern town. “We bought a cute little house with a large plot of dirt in the backyard, so I planted the only thing I knew—vegetables—but some critters consumed everything,” said Nancy.  “So, I called my mother who suggested that I try planting roses.”

Nancy proceeded to order six bare root roses from Wayside Gardens, a mail order company. “When they arrived, I was shocked; nothing but sticks, sticks on the top and sticks on the bottom. I had no idea which end to plant, but I gave it my best shot and in six weeks, I had roses! I was hooked. I went to our local nursery and bought six more rose bushes, giving me now… a dozen roses.”

In 1997, Nancy and Robert moved back to Dallas to a house in Preston Hollow on Tulip Lane, and she was inspired to continue growing roses. With a two-year-old son and another on the way, she longed for a rose bed. “Being quite pregnant at the time, my mother offered to have someone come build my first Dallas rose bed.” Having room for 33 roses in that bed and a lot more space in her yard, Nancy realized she could build more beds and plant more bushes.

Robert thought they ought to plant additional rose bushes in the front yard since their house sits on a well-traveled corner, and more people could enjoy the roses.  

Nancy began researching roses all over North America. “I did a lot of research. I reviewed catalogues, scanned the Internet and discovered the website helpmefind.com/roses – it’s my rose bible.” She also goes to many botanical gardens, including the Dallas Arboretum, and she sometimes visits growers.

In 1998, Nancy entered her first roses in a Dallas Rose Society Rose Show. “After winning my first blue ribbon, I was inspired to get really serious about rose growing. We started building raised beds, paying attention to the soil and finding even more unique varieties that would do well in North Texas.”

Roses became a family affair for the Pierce family. With two sons, Chip and Jack, Nancy had three capable men to help her take care of her passion. It takes Nancy 16 hours just to prune the bushes in the spring, so she spends many hours tending to them.

Two years ago her rose garden was submitted to the archives of the Smithsonian Institute, showcasing her amazing rose growing acumen.

“Growing close to 250 rose bushes, and the reward of creating something beautiful for myself and for my family really blossomed into an extended group of visitors who would stop and literally smell the roses. People would leave me notes, take photos of the roses, tell me their stories, and ask for rose growing advice. People would come from other towns to see my roses. The real joy of my rose garden was the pleasure it brought to others.”

All along, she documented her roses in a detailed spreadsheet and took thousands of photos of them over the years. Someone suggested she use her beautiful photos to create a notecard collection, which she’s done. “My legacy is now my rose card business.” Additionally, she is working on her website, fittingly named Texas Rose Lady with stories and rose growing tips.

This past summer, the Pierces sold their home on Tulip Lane and were unable to move their multitude of roses with them.  Nancy kept a dozen unique and hard to find rose bushes for her new home where she has limited sun and space to garden.

After meeting with Dallas Arboretum President Mary Brinegar this summer to talk “roses,” Nancy got the idea that maybe the botanical garden would be a good place to donate the 200 rose bushes. The roses will be planted in the Boswell Family Garden with a sign that reads, “Donated by Robert and Nancy Pierce in honor of Cherrie Perkins Wells,” Nancy’s mother. That’s how the roses that used to be on Tulip Lane ended up at the Arboretum.

When asked what roses have taught her, Nancy thoughtfully replied, “Roses are very forgiving. You can neglect them, prune them too hard…. and they will still perform for you. The joy of gardening is in watching God’s handiwork become your own. It is therapeutic, uplifting and gives one a sense of purpose.”

 

Advice on planting roses:

Beds: Raised beds allow you to control your soil and drainage.

Soil: Amend your soil with compost and mulch to adjust its pH to slightly acidic.

Best time to plant:

After the last freeze, usually the second week in March.

Pruning: If you prune hard, you create larger blooms. If you prune small, you’ll have smaller blooms.

Watering: Roses love water. They don’t like wet feet, so drainage is important. That’s why raised beds work best.

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International Paper Donation AJ Forrest, Account Manager, International Paper Company; Crystal Brown-Tatum, Human Resources Administrator, International Paper Company; Ron Bullock, Complex General Manager, International Paper Company; J. Mark Wolf, Dallas Arboretum Board Chairman

International Paper Company has donated $50,000 to the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden to be the presenting sponsor of its STEM Education program. This donation will provide additional opportunities to teach STEM to students, to fund grants for Title 1 schools to bring their students to the garden, and to equip educators in the latest STEM teaching practices.  

 

Allyson Marbut, Dallas Arboretum’s vice president of education, said “In addition to being a top display garden where we grow plants through our experiential educational field trips, outreach programs and professional development for teachers, we grow minds, too. Thanks to this grant, we’ll be able to fund these STEM education initiatives.”

 

The STEM programs that the gift will support include the following:

 

  • Field Trips and Financial Assistance for Title I Schools: Each year, the Dallas Arboretum provides funding for bus stipends and scholarships to visiting low-income schools.

 

  • Nature Naturally: Through this outreach program, local teachers can bring any of the Dallas Arboretum’s indoor lessons directly to their own school campus.

 

  • Summer Institute: This one-week summer camp partners with the Vickery Meadows Foundation Eagle Scholars to provide unique STEM learning experiences for at-risk 7th grade Tasby Middle School students.

 

  • STEM First and STEM in Action: The Dallas Arboretum partners with DISD elementary schools to implement two off-site after school programs, STEM First (3rd grade) and STEM in Action (5th grade) along with a visit to the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden.

 

  • Professional Development for Educators: Arboretum educators provide teacher training programs that cover best practices in STEM education and engage teachers with ways to integrate hands-on activities in their classroom.

 

The Dallas Arboretum’s education programs focus on outdoor STEM, empowering children to apply science concepts aligned with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for K-6 curriculum to the outdoor world.  The Arboretum Education team utilizes 150 interactive, science driven lessons that immerse more than 100,000 North Texas students, with a focus from kindergarten to 6th grade, in invigorating scientific inquiry each year.

 

The Dallas Arboretum’s most elaborate educational resource is the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden (RMCAG), an 8-acre outdoor science museum full of interactive science based displays, laboratories and specialized outdoor learning galleries. Its design juxtaposes White Rock Lake and surrounding ecosystems with informal scientific observation and inquiry. To create this revolutionary “living classroom,” Arboretum educators first identified those concepts that children struggle to master, then targeted these difficult concepts through RMCAG’s hands-on, curriculum-aligned activities.  Engaging lessons vary from students learning about Texas wetlands through sampling and identification of macroinvertebrates in Wetlands Biologists, to learning the importance of trees in Tree Trek, the cycles of the earth in Dynamic Earth, to a study of the planets through a Planetary Voyage on our five-foot OmniGlobe. Visits to the Moody Oasis provide opportunities to learn the importance of monarch butterflies as they pass by on their way to their winter grounds and Pure Energy with its water, solar and wind interactives engaging them in learning the importance of renewable resources.

 

Since its ribbon-cutting in 2013, RMCAG has hosted more than 1.7 million visits from children and families, students on field trips, summer camp participants, and curious adults.

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. It is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular general admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 2-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under.  See website for special discounts. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $9. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

 

 

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Founders Garden at Dallas Arboretum Jenny Wegley, Dallas Arboretum's vice president of horticulture, shows garden guests proper gardening techniques during the first Founders Garden Club workshop.

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden announces that the Founders Garden Club of Dallas will present a workshop entitled “Everything You Wanted to Know About Fall Vegetable Gardening” on Saturday, July 28 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Rosine Hall with a tour of A Tasteful Place following the session. This event is free to those with paid garden admission.

 

Founders Garden Club of Dallas, a Garden Club of America member, is sponsoring this day to help garden guests learn the essentials of planning, preparation, planting, growing and harvesting fresh vegetables – both in a garden plot or containers.  

 

Current club President Barbara Hunt Crow said, “This workshop will focus on fall gardening as our North Texas climate is perfect for growing many vegetables such as cucumbers, squash, lettuce and more. One goal of Founders is to be able to sponsor informative workshops, and the Dallas Arboretum is the perfect partner to help make it happen.”

 

The day begins with a welcome by Dallas Arboretum President and CEO Mary Brinegar followed by the first workshop, “Planning for a Fall Vegetable Garden,” by Daniel Cunningham of Texas AgriLife.

 

Next, Dallas Arboretum’s Vice President of Horticulture Jenny Wegley speaks about “Vegetable Selection and Planting: What, When and How.”

 

Following lunch, Barbara Brown of Denton County Master Gardeners discusses “Harvesting and Preserving the Bounty From Your Garden.” The last speaker, Dana Wilson of North Haven Gardens, talks about composting.

 

After guests attend this informative workshop, Wegley will take participants to see the Dallas Arboretum’s latest garden, A Tasteful Place, a new 3.5-acre, $12 million edible display garden that showcases the best gardening practices with fruit, herbs and vegetables. She will explain additional gardening techniques in these Potager Gardens, which translate as an ornamental kitchen garden. The Potager Gardens are a signature element of the development with in-season vegetables, herbs and flowers, planted ornamentally and interspersed with flowers to attract pollinators and beneficial insects.  Of the four potagers, one is named for the late Marilyn R. Corrigan and the other for her daughter, Catherine A. Corrigan, both Founders Garden Club members.

 

For more information on the July 28th event or to register, contact Linda Herrington at 214-515-6640 or via email at lherrington@dallasarboretum.org.

 

About the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden:

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

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Jenny Wegley

Jenny Wegley has loved to watch her personal garden grow, as well as the garden she tends to in her job as vice president of horticulture at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden. Her work has now been acknowledged with another recognition from her alma mater, Stephen F. Austin State University, where she recently received the Distinguished Alumni Award in Agriculture.

 

A 2005 graduate with a bachelor of science in agriculture and an emphasis in horticulture, Wegley has been interested in this field for many years. After graduation, she worked in horticultural retail until she was hired at the Dallas Arboretum in 2009. 

 

Wegley has lead the landscape design and planting selections for the entire garden for more than six years. This past year, she and Mark Bullitt, senior director of garden development, selected all the varieties of vegetables for the newest garden at the Dallas Arboretum, A Tasteful Place. This 3.5-acre edible garden teaches people what grows well in the North Texas climate, when to plant and how to harvest fruits, vegetables and herbs. In addition to the four signature potager gardens, which are working kitchen gardens, A Tasteful Place has a one-acre lagoon with aquatic plants that Wegley selected, a pavilion with a teaching and demonstration kitchen, an orchard, shaded porches and walkways.

 

Wegley said, “The movement toward growing and eating sustainable fresh, locally grown food has been evident by how many people have visited A Tasteful Place, attended gardening workshops, watched chef demonstrations and asked our gardeners questions.”

 

This was not the only award she has received. She has received one of the ‘40 under 40’ who are making a difference in horticulture in America today.

 

Wegley said, “I love the vast array of what you can do with horticulture. There’s so much to learn.” Her position gives her the perfect place to learn, especially as the Dallas Arboretum trials more than 5,000 cultivars annually. Before A Tasteful Place was open, Wegley and her Horticulture team trialed vegetables for nearly six years before they planted anything in the garden. The Dallas Arboretum is one of the few places in the region that has been trialing vegetables in a large-scale way. This type of learning helps the Horticulture staff and those who visit the garden learn what varieties grow best.

 

When she’s not working, Wegley tends to her own garden in Oak Cliff where she’s growing tomatoes, artichokes, soybeans and carrots. Whether it’s at home or work, she enjoys making her gardens grow.