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Dallas Arboretum photo credit: Dallas Arboretum

With freezing weather approaching, it is important to take precautions to ensure your plants are protected from extreme weather conditions.  Following a few simple steps prescribed by Dave Forehand, Dallas Arboretum vice president of gardens, will enable your plants to survive the sometimes-harsh North Texas cold spells. 

Water plants before freeze:

First, water plants before a freeze, particularly the plant root zone. Water acts like a blanket insulating the roots. This makes the plant stronger against a freeze. When plant cells are full of water, they are less likely to be subject to frost damage. If possible, water a day or two before a freeze and make sure to water the entire root zone of the plant. This is especially important in newly planted trees and shrubs. Try watering early in the day so plants have time to absorb water before a freeze. If at all possible, avoid watering the foliage. If you have an irrigation system, hand watering might be the best option for certain locations. Keeping water off the foliage prevents the formation of ice on leaf material which can cause breaks and more damage.

Cover cold sensitive plants:

Cover them with blankets, sheets or towels. Do not use plastic because it is not breathable and will freeze to the plants causing damage. When daytime temperatures rise above freezing, it is important to remove the cover because, if left under cover all day, temperatures under the blankets can get too warm, damaging the plants and waking them from dormancy. 

If possible, use frost cloth:

Frost cloth acts as a blanket and helps trap heat. Make sure that you secure the cloth entirely around the plant and tighten to the soil using fabric pins or bricks (anything that will hold it down firmly will work). Frost cloth is made from a product that “breathes,” and this cloth helps against burn caused by other materials. Purchase frost cloth months in advance, if possible. When the threat of a freeze is coming, frost cloth sells out quickly. Do not use frost cloth when there is a chance of snow. Otherwise, it will cause more damage breaking plants from the weight of the snow.

Take care of plants constantly:

The healthier your plants are, the more prone they are to handle stress. Proper water and maintenance throughout the growing season will help in the winter months. It is also important to select the right plant for your area.  Check to make sure that the plant material you select is appropriate for your location. Check out USDA plant hardiness zone map to see what zone you live in. This information will help you purchase the best plant material for your zone.

Move plants inside, especially with high winds:

When high winds are a threat, it is a good idea to move potted plants into a shed or garage. Although plants don’t feel wind-chill, cold winds quickly dry them out.  Most plants can survive upper 30-degree temperatures easily in a shed or garage because these areas usually don’t drop below freezing until severe weather in February. 

For more plant tips, visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

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Dallas Arboretum The 12 Days of Christmas at the Dallas Arboretum features a dozen gazebos that resemble larger-than-life glass encased music boxes filled with whimsical animals and mannequins.

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden welcomed its millionth visitor for the year over the Thanksgiving holiday, and it’s the second year in a row that the garden has reached more than a million visitors. In 2016, the Arboretum’s millionth visitor came in early December, so it achieved the mark even earlier this year. Total 2016 attendance was 1,095,051. The Dallas Arboretum has had visitors from all 50 states and more than 90 countries.

 

Dallas Arboretum Board Chairman J. Mark Wolf said, “We want to thank our more than 39,000 members and donors for supporting us, along with 2,000 volunteers who have helped our garden grow and reach a million visitors. Our popular garden festivals, Dallas Blooms and Autumn at the Arboretum, are fantastic times to experience the outdoors each spring with half a million spring-blooming bulbs, and each autumn with 90,000 pumpkins, gourds and squash. ZimSculpt, an international sculpture exhibition, attracted more than 267,000 guests in the spring and summer months to watch hand-carved sculptures being made and to meet two of the Zimbabwean sculptors. Finally, The 12 Days of Christmas exhibition, which just opened this month, has brought many people during the day and more in the evenings with half a million lights illuminating the garden.”

 

Named by Southern Living as one of “The South's Best Holiday Experiences,” The 12 Days of Christmas exhibit features 12 elaborate, 25-foot-tall Victorian gazebos filled with the charming costumed characters, whimsical animals and winter scenes made famous by the beloved Christmas carol. The gazebos are encased in glass and extravagantly decorated on all sides to provide a dramatic, three-dimensional experience that adds to its "music box" quality.

 

Holiday at the Arboretum, presented by Reliant, includes The 12 Days of Christmas, sponsored by Amegy Bank of Texas, along with “The Nutcracker Suite,” a new exhibition in the historic DeGolyer House. This collection includes more than 800 nutcrackers on display in various rooms, which are lavishly decorated to resemble scenes from the ballet. The figurines are from two private collections: Rosemary Thornton Brinegar and the Himert Family Collection. The exhibition, sponsored by Amegy Bank of Texas, runs now through January 7.

 

The 12 Days of Christmas is open daily and runs through January 7, 2018. The 12 Days of Christmas at night exhibit is open every Wednesday through Sunday and other select evenings, and runs through December 30. For more information on Holiday at the Arboretum events and exhibitions, check the website at www.dallasarboretum.org or the Arboretum’s social media.

 

Since the Dallas Arboretum opened to the public in 1984, the 66-acre garden has received many accolades from publications including Architectural Digest, USA Today, Fodor's Travel, Trip Advisor, The Travel Channel and many others. The Arboretum includes many formal and informal garden spaces, world-recognized trial gardens, a concert lawn, picnic areas, food service areas, a gift shop, orientation theater, classrooms and the historic DeGolyer House. In 2013, the eight-acre scientific and interactive Rory Meyer's Children Adventure Garden opened. In 2014, the Arboretum opened a 1,150-space parking garage, thereby doubling the amount of parking spaces. In 2017, the garden debuted A Tasteful Place, a 3.5-acre edible display vegetable, fruit and herb garden, along with a pavilion, lagoon and views of downtown Dallas’ iconic skyline.

 

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Growing Friends Hosts: Justin and Molly Cox, Blake and Catherine Woodall, Taylor and Richmond Collinsworth

A Tasteful Place, Dallas Arboretum’s newest year-round food destination, was the perfect foodie hot spot for the "Four Chefs Under Forty" on October 18. The evening served as the launch event for Growing Friends, a new membership level at the Dallas Arboretum for those 21 to 40 years old. Hosts Taylor and Richard Collinsworth, Molly and Justin Cox, Kari and Troy Kloewer and Catherine and Blake Woodall invited 200 of their friends and colleagues to be some of the first to party at A Tasteful Place, a 3.5-acre garden with a lagoon, pavilion and beautiful views of Dallas’ skyline, while listening to the band, the Culdesac Kids.

Well dressed guests walked the pathways of A Tasteful Place to see what was growing in the new gardens, all while sampling the delectable delights, generously prepared by the celebrity chefs. Chef Uno Immanivong of Chino Chinatown served a poke daikon taco. Chef Daniel Pittman of LUCK at Trinity Groves served a house pastrami slider with pickled beets and candied jalapenos. Chef Anastacia Quinones of Oddfellows served farro risotto with braised beef short rib and arugula, and Chef Andrea Shackelford of Harvest Seasonal Kitchen served nduja with yogurt and a crispy artichoke chip.

“I am so thankful for the Dallas Arboretum and to be able to be involved with a great organization. For those who are interested in helping to maintain and preserve this treasure in Dallas, please join Growing Friends,” said Taylor Collinsworth, co-host for Four Chefs Under Forty.

For more information about Growing Friends, visit http://www.dallasarboretum.org/support-volunteer/levels-benefits.

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Galapago

For most teachers, learning doesn’t stop in the summer. In fact, the Dallas Arboretum Education Department hosts professional training for 500 teachers annually, and much of that training takes place in the summer months.  This summer, two members of the Arboretum's education team also had the opportunity of a lifetime to expand their own knowledge, as well as to help educators in one of the world's most unique natural environments, the Galapagos Islands. 

 

Allyson Marbut, Dallas Arboretum vice president of education, said, “The Arboretum’s Education Department provides high quality, standards-aligned professional development for teachers with a focus on life and earth science, particularly in the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden where we are a Certified Monarch Waystation, a National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat, and a Texas Parks & Wildlife Certified Texas Aquatic Science field site. The eight-acre garden’s mission is to get children and adults excited about nature and science as they learn through engaging, hands-on activities, most of which are held outdoors.”

 

The Arboretum has teachers who have a combined 120 years of experience. They teach more than 110,000 children who attend field trips, camps and other educational classes annually in the garden or offsite at schools.

 

Earlier this summer for the first time, Dallas Arboretum Education’s Dustin Miller, director of education, and Marisol Rodriguez, bilingual specialist, were invited to help train 125 teachers in the Galapagos Islands in the sciences using the area’s abundant natural environment as a learning lab, with a substantial focus on resource conservation. They joined five additional professors and graduate students from Southern Methodist University, Stanford University, North Carolina State University and Oregon State University. In coordination with other instructors, the team led a five-day workshop for 125 elementary, middle school and secondary science teachers from two of the Galapagos Islands.

 

In open air classrooms, surrounded by the natural environment, Galapagos teachers received in-depth professional development in content knowledge, how to teach lessons (pedagogy) and actual experiment time showing them how to perform the lessons. The teachers capped off the week by presenting a new lesson plan that they would be able to implement in their classroom upon returning to their schools. In total, they received 50 hours of professional development, largely funded through the Galapagos Conservancy, which partnered with the Ministry of Education of Ecuador.

 

Miller said, “Because of the distance from the mainland, Galapagos teachers do not often have access to professional development, so this public/private partnership provides high quality training for teachers that the government could not easily afford. This partnership also serves as a model for how to train teachers in hard to reach places.”

 

Diego Román, Ph.D., assistant professor and Dara Rossi, Ph.D., clinical associate professor, both in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development at Southern Methodist University, were part of the teaching team. They had originally met the Dallas Arboretum Education team when the professors first started serving as members of the Arboretum's Education and Research Committee. This committee advised on planning, developing, building and programming of the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden, which opened in 2013, and continues to collaborate in support of Arboretum education efforts.

 

Dr. Rossi said, “SMU has been exploring ways to partner with the informal science community, and this was a great way to showcase the work the Dallas Arboretum does, such as science teacher training, workshops and professional development.” She added, “Traditional teacher-led education is prevalent in the Galapagos, so we work with them to create lessons that can be run by students and are also active and engaging.”

 

When it came to teaching scientific lessons, both Dallas Arboretum team members were at an advantage because they could teach in Spanish.

 

Dr. Román added, “Marisol’s knowledge of early childhood and bilingual education and Dustin’s science knowledge were an asset to training these teachers.”

 

The team taught lessons based on matter and energy content tied into conservation, an important aspect of the Galapagos Islands with a population of 20,000 people and more than two million visitors annually. Some examples:

 

Lightbox: Educators explored how different materials refract light, learned about solar light, and used this knowledge to create models using solar light.

 

Forms of energy: Teachers utilized energy stations (electrical/light, mechanical, sound, wind, chemical, solar and alternative energy small cars that are powered with saltwater) to explore and identify energy forms and sources in nature.

 

Matter lesson: Teachers made Oobleck, a non-Newtonian fluid, which acts like a liquid when being poured, but like a solid when a force is acting on it.

 

Transfer of heat: Teachers explored several heat transfer stations to understand conduction, convection and radiation, and the exercise culminated in the construction of updraft towers.

 

Straw rockets: Using straw rockets, teachers conducted scientific experiments by varying both the trajectory angle and the amount of energy used to launch these rockets.

 

Zip line airplanes: Educators built and raced model airplanes, while exploring variables and comparing Galapagos bird appendages with early plane design.

 

Eggdrop: Teachers applied concepts of momentum, impulse, force and energy using an egg, a toilet paper roll, a pizza pan, a cup and a broom.

 

Dr. Román said, “Teachers in the Galapagos do not have access to as many materials as we do in the U.S., so we adopted lessons that could take advantage of their environment and best leverage the resources they have at hand. For example, we used many recycled items for our experiments.”

 

The team provided the teachers with lessons that are easily replicable, along with the materials and supplies they would need for their students to study that particular concept.

 

What did the team learn? Miller said, “Teachers everywhere have the same struggles. They may not have the content knowledge or the right supplies to teach, and they may lack the time to fully teach difficult-to-understand concepts. Their students aren’t interested in learning science only from a book, so we need to make the concepts engaging and practical.”

 

Dr. Rossi added, “Research shows that it takes hours to change teachers’ thinking and beliefs before they will adapt their practices and how they teach. As we’ve continued to work with these educators, we have already started to see significant changes in their practice and a renewed excitement for teaching.”

 

The Dallas Arboretum hopes to return to the Galapagos, or another country, to train even more teachers in the future, in addition to the ones they train locally.

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Mark Wolf, Barb Sypult, Kaki Hopkins, Craig Hall

On the heels of a successful Artscape Reimagined at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, Artscape Chairwoman Kaki Hopkins, along with her stellar committee, hosted the Great Contributor to Art Award and Invitational Fine Art Auction on Friday, May 12. The black tie event began with a cocktail reception and hors d’oeuvres, giving attendees time to peruse the live and silent auction items, which were generously donated by dozens of acclaimed artists and local Dallas notables, such as Mayor Mike Rawlings, Dr. Kern Wildenthal and Jim Keyes.  The springtime weather served as the perfect backdrop for the first time event.

 

J. Mark Wolf, Dallas Arboretum chairman of the board, welcomed guests. After dinner, he called up Gloria Snead, Artscape Award Chair, to join him. Wolf said, “It is my pleasure to introduce the Great Contributor to Art Award. This aptly named prize was designed and contributed by Gary Lee Price, whose Great Contributors exhibition at the Arboretum in 2016 was the inspiration for the award’s name. Receiving this inaugural award tonight is someone we know and admire deeply, Craig Hall.  Craig, who is an entrepreneur, businessman, New York Times bestselling author and philanthropist, is also a lifelong art collector.  He believes that art nourishes the human spirit and can make a profound difference in people’s lives.  His company, HALL Group, displays an extensive contemporary art collection at their properties. Craig truly embodies this award, so we are pleased to welcome and honor Craig Hall tonight as the inaugural awardee of the Great Contributor to Art Award.”

 

“It is an honor to receive the Artscape Great Contributor to Public Art award, and being able to share our art collection with the public has been a great joy of mine,” said Craig Hall, founder and chairman of HALL Group and the evening’s award recipient. “However, tonight’s award is really a tribute to the talented artists who make all of this possible. It is because of their hard work and creativity that we are able to contribute art for our communities to enjoy.”

 

Hopkins added, “It was a great pleasure to have Craig Hall as our inaugural awardee. He has done so much to make art available for the public to enjoy by investing in many artists' works and displaying them so they can be seen by all. He is a terrific citizen of our city, and we are fortunate that he calls the Dallas Arts District his home.”

 

The live auction generated plenty of spirited bidding, especially Pamela Nelson’s “Mother Plant,” which graced the invitation cover, program cover and notecards given to patrons. Hopkins added, “I was overwhelmed by the artists’ and galleries’ generosity and pleased that our audience showed them the appreciation we all felt by participating in a spirited and fun auction.”

 

The Artscape Selection Committee and Heritage Auctions chose the following for the live auction, with the criteria to create a group diverse in style. Each artist graciously donated his/her piece to benefit the Dallas Arboretum, with many nature-inspired:

 

Carly Allen-Martin – “Exhale Doubt 2/50”

Carolyn Brown – “White Rose” and “Orange Ruffled Rose”

Marianne Gargour – “Visions Revisited”

Beth Hickman – “Moonlight Gardening”

Arienne Lepretre – “Arboretum Day”

Christopher H. Martin – “Cassini Disc II”

Pamela Nelson – “Mother Plant”

Brad Oldham – “Traveling Man”

Jessie Palmer (Am. 1882-1956) – “Still Life with Roses”

Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir – “Source II”

George Tobolowsky – “Looking for Light”

Mary Tomás – “Bloom”

Mary Vernon – “Raccoon”

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. It is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. Visit dallasarboretum.org or Facebook for more information.

 

 

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Mark Wolf, Barb Sypult, Kaki Hopkins, Craig Hall

On the heels of a successful Artscape Reimagined at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, Artscape Chairwoman Kaki Hopkins, along with her stellar committee, hosted the Great Contributor to Art Award and Invitational Fine Art Auction on Friday, May 12. The black tie event began with a cocktail reception and hors d’oeuvres, giving attendees time to peruse the live and silent auction items, which were generously donated by dozens of acclaimed artists and local Dallas notables, such as Mayor Mike Rawlings, Dr. Kern Wildenthal and Jim Keyes.  The springtime weather served as the perfect backdrop for the first time event.

 

J. Mark Wolf, Dallas Arboretum chairman of the board, welcomed guests. After dinner, he called up Gloria Snead, Artscape Award Chair, to join him. Wolf said, “It is my pleasure to introduce the Great Contributor to Art Award. This aptly named prize was designed and contributed by Gary Lee Price, whose Great Contributors exhibition at the Arboretum in 2016 was the inspiration for the award’s name. Receiving this inaugural award tonight is someone we know and admire deeply, Craig Hall.  Craig, who is an entrepreneur, businessman, New York Times bestselling author and philanthropist, is also a lifelong art collector.  He believes that art nourishes the human spirit and can make a profound difference in people’s lives.  His company, HALL Group, displays an extensive contemporary art collection at their properties. Craig truly embodies this award, so we are pleased to welcome and honor Craig Hall tonight as the inaugural awardee of the Great Contributor to Art Award.”

 

“It is an honor to receive the Artscape Great Contributor to Public Art award, and being able to share our art collection with the public has been a great joy of mine,” said Craig Hall, founder and chairman of HALL Group and the evening’s award recipient. “However, tonight’s award is really a tribute to the talented artists who make all of this possible. It is because of their hard work and creativity that we are able to contribute art for our communities to enjoy.”

 

Hopkins added, “It was a great pleasure to have Craig Hall as our inaugural awardee. He has done so much to make art available for the public to enjoy by investing in many artists' works and displaying them so they can be seen by all. He is a terrific citizen of our city, and we are fortunate that he calls the Dallas Arts District his home.”

 

The live auction generated plenty of spirited bidding, especially Pamela Nelson’s “Mother Plant,” which graced the invitation cover, program cover and notecards given to patrons. Hopkins added, “I was overwhelmed by the artists’ and galleries’ generosity and pleased that our audience showed them the appreciation we all felt by participating in a spirited and fun auction.”

 

The Artscape Selection Committee and Heritage Auctions chose the following for the live auction, with the criteria to create a group diverse in style. Each artist graciously donated his/her piece to benefit the Dallas Arboretum, with many nature-inspired:

 

Carly Allen-Martin – “Exhale Doubt 2/50”

Carolyn Brown – “White Rose” and “Orange Ruffled Rose”

Marianne Gargour – “Visions Revisited”

Beth Hickman – “Moonlight Gardening”

Arienne Lepretre – “Arboretum Day”

Christopher H. Martin – “Cassini Disc II”

Pamela Nelson – “Mother Plant”

Brad Oldham – “Traveling Man”

Jessie Palmer (Am. 1882-1956) – “Still Life with Roses”

Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir – “Source II”

George Tobolowsky – “Looking for Light”

Mary Tomás – “Bloom”

Mary Vernon – “Raccoon”

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. It is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. Visit dallasarboretum.org or Facebook for more information.

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Hugh Stewart, Sharon Van Meter, Richard Chamberlai

On a perfect spring evening among the backdrop of Dallas Blooms, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden held its own inaugural Food & Wine Festival on March 16 to celebrate cuisine and libations from many cultures. More than 1,300 people sipped libations, sampled food and desserts from 40 chefs, and enjoyed a concert featuring Hobo Cane, a blend of pop and acoustic with a Latin flare, at the Martin Rutchik Concert Stage & Lawn.

 

Chef Sharon Van Meter, president of 3015 at Trinity Groves, chaired the festival. "2017 is the year of culinary pursuits for the Dallas Arboretum. The chefs of Dallas were excited about, not only, the first Dallas Arboretum Food and Wine Festival that sold out, but beyond ecstatic about A Tasteful Place opening later this year.”

 

Mark Wolf, Dallas Arboretum board chairman, added, “A special thanks to all the chefs who participated in this successful Food & Wine Festival. Their food was both creative and delicious. We look forward to more food events, especially when we open A Tasteful Place, a two-acre garden inspired by the movement toward garden-to-table dining sustainability and healthier lifestyles.”

 

Sponsors include Dallas Southwest Osteopathic Physicians, Rosewood Ranches Wagyu Beef, Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits, SVM Productions, FreshPoint, Acqua Panna, S.Pellegrino, Lakewood Brewing Co. and Oak Highlands Brewery. Media sponsors include D Magazine and CultureMap.

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

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Lyda Hill, Caroline Rose Hunt, Robert Brackbill La

The Caroline Rose Hunt Society, which provides support for the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, held a dinner for 75 of its members at Marianne Planke’s home on Strait Lane on November 30.  Caroline Rose Hunt attended along with many of her family including children Steve Sands and his wife Marcy Sands; Patrick Sands and his wife Kristy Sands; and her daughter, Laurie Sands Harrison. Other family included Caroline L. Hunt, Houston Hunt and his wife Betsy Hunt and Lyda Hill, Caroline Rose Hunt’s niece, and other guests Margot and Ross Perot, Mark Wolf, Dallas Arboretum board chairman and his wife, Lynda Calkin Wolf, and Bob White with Bank of Texas, also sponsor of the Caroline Rose Hunt Society dinner.

 

Guests enjoyed hors d’oeuvres while listening to a trio of violinists during the cocktail hour and throughout dinner. The tables were filled with floral creations designed exquisitely by Junior of The Garden Gate, while the dinner was catered by Cassandra Fine Catering.

 

These donors include many philanthropic leaders who support the vision and current expansion projects for the Dallas Arboretum and city. Participation in the Caroline Rose Hunt Society begins with a contribution of $10,000. Those interested in joining can contact Karen Reardon at 214.515.6601 or kreardon@dallasarboretum.org.

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Flower House

On May 16, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden kicks off Summer at the Arboretum, sponsored by Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate, CBRE and Mutual of Omaha Bank, with the return of “Flower Houses: Fairy Tales with a Texas Twist.” Continuing the year-long “Deep in the Hearts of Texans” theme, the flower village features four topiary houses up to 15-feet-tall enveloped in red, white and blue flowers. Each house highlights a Texas-inspired fairy tale vignette—a picante gingerbread man dances around a babbling brook; Goldilocks’ irascible cousin finds herself behind the Pine Curtain, and stubborn livestock starts a chain of events causing a kerfuffle across the prairie.*

 

Summer at the Arboretum also includes a replica of the Rio Grande, a western covered chuck wagon, two life-size topiary horses, two large topiary longhorn cattle, affectionately named “Lone Star” and “Blue Bonnet,” and a hay bale maze. All summer long there will be activities, events and music for garden guests to enjoy.

 

Visitors are encouraged to visit the eight-acre Rory Meyer’s Children’s Adventure Garden and experience the exciting labs and hands-on activities where science and fun become one.

 

Dave Forehand, Dallas Arboretum’s vice president of gardens, said, “As the days get warmer, look for the houses to transition to lush foliage displays of ipomoea sedans bronze, ipomoea desana lime, coleus burgundy trailing plum and ipomoea tricolor. For the first time ever, you’ll see true ‘green houses’ nestled under the welcoming shade of the trees in Pecan Grove.”

 

He added, “In the gardens, the beds are bursting with plants full of blooms like ageratum, impatiens, petunias, cleome, begonias, salvia, marigolds and zinnias.  As the temperatures warm, caladiums, sunpatiens, lantana, pride of Barbados, variegated tapioca, elephant ears, coleus will be added to the gardens.”

 

 

 

 

Activities include the following:

 

Memorial Day Weekend:  Friday, May 22-Monday, May 25

Celebrate Memorial Day weekend at the Dallas Arboretum.

-In the Pecan Grove, children of all ages can enjoy a petting zoo and face painting all weekend long from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

-On Friday, May 22, families can decorate strollers and wagons from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. for the Memorial Day Stroller and Wagon Parade that starts at 1 p.m. at the Alex Camp House. Prizes will be awarded.

-On Monday, May 25 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., there are two Eddie Coker concerts, at the Martin Rutchik Concert Stage & Lawn. Cost is free with paid garden admission. The concerts are sponsored by DallasChild.

-Guests can enjoy $2 hot dogs and root beer floats in certain locations in the garden as well as patriotic music all weekend.

-Admission is free all four days for all active and retired military personnel and first responders with valid photo ID at the ticket booth.

 

Stories in the Flower Village

Mondays: June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

11 a.m.

Tuckered out from Toad Fountain? Parents, grandparents and caregivers are invited to bring young readers and pre-readers for storytime under the shade of the flower houses in the Pecan Grove.

 

Family Fun Fridays

June 5, 12, 19 & 26 and July 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Plan the family’s summertime adventures at the Arboretum on Fridays in June and July in the Pecan Grove. Join other families for kid-friendly activities that include face painting, a petting zoo and music for the little ones in the shady Pecan Grove—topped off with a cool spray of water in the Toad Fountains! Bring everyone to experience the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden featuring the wonders of life and earth science combined with hands-on fun for all ages.

 

Sunday, June 7

Debbie Leland Book Reading and Signing, 1-3 p.m. Pecan Grove

Debbie Leland reads selections of The Jalapeño Man, a most spicy tale. An elementary school librarian from College Station, she has authored several children’s books, all with a recognizable southwest flavor.

 

Wednesdays, June 10 and June 24

“Golden Hour at the Dallas Arboretum”, 6 p.m.-9 p.m.

$10 non-members, $8 members

For these two evenings in June, the Dallas Arboretum opens its doors at special pricing to allow the community to capture those ‘golden hour’ photos in the showcase gardens.  Intended for personal photography and portraiture, the garden is open for a limited window to allow for bridal portraits, family photos, and hobby photographers. 

 

Commercial shoots are not allowed during this time and are encouraged to book through the Special Events Department.

 

Saturday, June 13**

WFAA Family First Day in the Rory Meyers Children’s Garden

Activities 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Puppet shows, hands-on outdoor science experiments (in conjunction with Texas A&M University), collaborative tessellation assembly, and scenes from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (with the Dallas Junior Players) round out a family-centered day anchored by a special presentation with WFAA Meteorologist Greg Fields at the OmniGlobe.  For this day, admission to the RMCAG and main garden is $8 at the gate only with $8 parking available for advance purchase online. Hot dogs are just $2.

 

Father’s Day Weekend: June 20 and 21

Saturday, June 20, 1:00-2:30 p.m.

Father’s Day Weekend Concert

Multilingual Balladeer Frank Obregon on the Martin Rutchik Concert Stage & Lawn

Enjoy an eclectic spectrum of music from Tony Bennett to Nat King Cole, and Antonio Carlos Jobim to Sinatra.  Relax with dad (on a lawn he doesn’t tend!), sip his favorite beverage, and maybe take a twirl around the stage!

 

Sunday, June 21, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

Children, grandchildren and their dads and granddads are invited to the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden for a craft activity—constructing and painting flower pots and bird houses—hosted by Home Depot. First come, first served.

 

Sunday, June 21, 1 p.m.-3 p.m.

Rosine Hall

Bring the superman in the family to the Arboretum to enjoy classic superhero cartoons shown in the air-conditioned comfort of Rosine Hall. On Father’s Day, Rosine is open for a come-and-go, blankets welcome viewing of vintage cartoons that can be enjoyed by the young and young-at-heart. Each short is approximately 10 minutes. There is no additional cost with paid entry to the garden, and popcorn and snacks are available onsite.

 

Fourth of July Celebration

Thursday, July 2 – Dallas Winds

Gates 6 p.m. Concert 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

The last concert of the spring/summer Cool Thursdays Concert Series features the patriot songs of the Dallas Winds. Enjoy a colorful summer sunset, the music and a picnic overlooking White Rock Lake. The Dallas Winds is the leading professional civilian wind band in the United States. Comprised of 50 woodwind, brass and percussion players, the band performs an eclectic blend of musical styles ranging from Bach to Bernstein and Sousa to Strauss. The costume contest is to come dressed as "Lady Liberty or Uncle Sam" in the best and brightest red, white and blue outfit. Separate tickets, which are between $10 and $27, are required and available online. The concert is sponsored by Retirement Rescue Advisors LLC.

 

Fourth of July Weekend Activities

Friday, July 3-Monday, July 6

Continuing the celebration of the nation’s independence in true red, white and blue style, active and retired members of the esteemed armed services receive free admission on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Patriotic music and flags throughout the garden add to the festivities.

 

 

 

Friday, July 24

Dallas Arboretum Presents: Garden Gigs, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

For the first time ever, the Dallas Arboretum hosts a full-grounds musical event open to the general public.  Local artists/musicians Salim Nourallah, John Lefler, Camille Cortinas and Sudie perform intimate sets at sundown in several gardens. Food trucks and BYOB round out a community event with tickets starting at $7 with parking included.

 

Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden

In the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden, there are plenty of activities for the young and young-at-heart including daily labs, talks and more. Check website for daily events.  

May 16: Where is Pidge?  Storytime and book signing with Michelle Staubach Grimes at 10:30 a.m. with special activities for children.

May 23: Girl Scouts in the Garden. Girl Scouts Troop #897 lead special activities for paid guests such as story time, leaf rubbings and scavenger hunts.

May 22-May 25: The garden debuts its brand new puppet show, Finding My Way Home, recorded by students from O’Banion Middle School.

June 13: WFAA Family First Day with activities from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See ** for more information.

June 21, 2015: On Father’s Day from 9 a.m. to 12 noon, Home Depot hosts a craft activity with flower pots and bird houses to construct and paint. First come, first served.

June 1-July 31: Popular Plant Lab H2Osmosis

August 1-31: Popular Plant Lab Back to School Mash

 

Mary Brinegar, president and CEO of the Dallas Arboretum, said, “The Dallas Arboretum is beautiful year-round, and the summer plantings are some of the loveliest for all to enjoy, along with a myriad of activities for everyone.”

 

See the website for special discounts and details, subject to availability. The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. It is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular general admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under.  See website for special discounts. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $8. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

 

 

*Books include Zeke and the Longhorn by David Davis; The Jalapeño Man by Debbie Leland; and Dusty Locks and the Three Bears by Susan Lowell.

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Daniel Ng, Painting

WHAT:          

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden hosts Artscape, a juried fine art show and sale presented by Lambert Landscape Company.  

 

WHEN:

Member preview: Friday, April 24, 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. (for members only with reservations and sold out)

Actual event open to the public: Saturday, April 25 and Sunday, April 26, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Entrance to the show on Saturday and Sunday is free with paid garden admission.

 

WHO:

Artscape features 75 artists from 14 states showcasing their nature-inspired artwork for sale including paintings, sculpture, 2-D and 3-D mixed media pieces, photography and more.

 

Artists of note who have juried into this year's show include Dale Robbins of Flemington, Mo., whose custom lathe, featured in Fine Woodworking and Wood magazines, has allowed him to create intricate works of art made entirely out of wood; Dallasites Scott Williams, a photographer, and Nikki Gulley, a painter, are a husband and wife duo who travel the world together capturing the beauty of their surroundings; Fred Prescott of Santa Fe, N.M., constructs colorful, kinetic sculptures that have been commissioned by Warner Brother Studios and Walt Disney Company.

 

More information: http://www.dallasarboretum.org/visit/seasonal-festivals-events/artscape

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $8. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.

 

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