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International Paper Donation AJ Forrest, Account Manager, International Paper Company; Crystal Brown-Tatum, Human Resources Administrator, International Paper Company; Ron Bullock, Complex General Manager, International Paper Company; J. Mark Wolf, Dallas Arboretum Board Chairman

International Paper Company has donated $50,000 to the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden to be the presenting sponsor of its STEM Education program. This donation will provide additional opportunities to teach STEM to students, to fund grants for Title 1 schools to bring their students to the garden, and to equip educators in the latest STEM teaching practices.  

 

Allyson Marbut, Dallas Arboretum’s vice president of education, said “In addition to being a top display garden where we grow plants through our experiential educational field trips, outreach programs and professional development for teachers, we grow minds, too. Thanks to this grant, we’ll be able to fund these STEM education initiatives.”

 

The STEM programs that the gift will support include the following:

 

  • Field Trips and Financial Assistance for Title I Schools: Each year, the Dallas Arboretum provides funding for bus stipends and scholarships to visiting low-income schools.

 

  • Nature Naturally: Through this outreach program, local teachers can bring any of the Dallas Arboretum’s indoor lessons directly to their own school campus.

 

  • Summer Institute: This one-week summer camp partners with the Vickery Meadows Foundation Eagle Scholars to provide unique STEM learning experiences for at-risk 7th grade Tasby Middle School students.

 

  • STEM First and STEM in Action: The Dallas Arboretum partners with DISD elementary schools to implement two off-site after school programs, STEM First (3rd grade) and STEM in Action (5th grade) along with a visit to the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden.

 

  • Professional Development for Educators: Arboretum educators provide teacher training programs that cover best practices in STEM education and engage teachers with ways to integrate hands-on activities in their classroom.

 

The Dallas Arboretum’s education programs focus on outdoor STEM, empowering children to apply science concepts aligned with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for K-6 curriculum to the outdoor world.  The Arboretum Education team utilizes 150 interactive, science driven lessons that immerse more than 100,000 North Texas students, with a focus from kindergarten to 6th grade, in invigorating scientific inquiry each year.

 

The Dallas Arboretum’s most elaborate educational resource is the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden (RMCAG), an 8-acre outdoor science museum full of interactive science based displays, laboratories and specialized outdoor learning galleries. Its design juxtaposes White Rock Lake and surrounding ecosystems with informal scientific observation and inquiry. To create this revolutionary “living classroom,” Arboretum educators first identified those concepts that children struggle to master, then targeted these difficult concepts through RMCAG’s hands-on, curriculum-aligned activities.  Engaging lessons vary from students learning about Texas wetlands through sampling and identification of macroinvertebrates in Wetlands Biologists, to learning the importance of trees in Tree Trek, the cycles of the earth in Dynamic Earth, to a study of the planets through a Planetary Voyage on our five-foot OmniGlobe. Visits to the Moody Oasis provide opportunities to learn the importance of monarch butterflies as they pass by on their way to their winter grounds and Pure Energy with its water, solar and wind interactives engaging them in learning the importance of renewable resources.

 

Since its ribbon-cutting in 2013, RMCAG has hosted more than 1.7 million visits from children and families, students on field trips, summer camp participants, and curious adults.

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. It is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular general admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 2-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under.  See website for special discounts. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $9. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit www.dallasarboretum.org.

 

 

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Founders Garden at Dallas Arboretum Jenny Wegley, Dallas Arboretum's vice president of horticulture, shows garden guests proper gardening techniques during the first Founders Garden Club workshop.

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden announces that the Founders Garden Club of Dallas will present a workshop entitled “Everything You Wanted to Know About Fall Vegetable Gardening” on Saturday, July 28 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Rosine Hall with a tour of A Tasteful Place following the session. This event is free to those with paid garden admission.

 

Founders Garden Club of Dallas, a Garden Club of America member, is sponsoring this day to help garden guests learn the essentials of planning, preparation, planting, growing and harvesting fresh vegetables – both in a garden plot or containers.  

 

Current club President Barbara Hunt Crow said, “This workshop will focus on fall gardening as our North Texas climate is perfect for growing many vegetables such as cucumbers, squash, lettuce and more. One goal of Founders is to be able to sponsor informative workshops, and the Dallas Arboretum is the perfect partner to help make it happen.”

 

The day begins with a welcome by Dallas Arboretum President and CEO Mary Brinegar followed by the first workshop, “Planning for a Fall Vegetable Garden,” by Daniel Cunningham of Texas AgriLife.

 

Next, Dallas Arboretum’s Vice President of Horticulture Jenny Wegley speaks about “Vegetable Selection and Planting: What, When and How.”

 

Following lunch, Barbara Brown of Denton County Master Gardeners discusses “Harvesting and Preserving the Bounty From Your Garden.” The last speaker, Dana Wilson of North Haven Gardens, talks about composting.

 

After guests attend this informative workshop, Wegley will take participants to see the Dallas Arboretum’s latest garden, A Tasteful Place, a new 3.5-acre, $12 million edible display garden that showcases the best gardening practices with fruit, herbs and vegetables. She will explain additional gardening techniques in these Potager Gardens, which translate as an ornamental kitchen garden. The Potager Gardens are a signature element of the development with in-season vegetables, herbs and flowers, planted ornamentally and interspersed with flowers to attract pollinators and beneficial insects.  Of the four potagers, one is named for the late Marilyn R. Corrigan and the other for her daughter, Catherine A. Corrigan, both Founders Garden Club members.

 

For more information on the July 28th event or to register, contact Linda Herrington at 214-515-6640 or via email at lherrington@dallasarboretum.org.

 

About the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden:

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

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Jenny Wegley

Jenny Wegley has loved to watch her personal garden grow, as well as the garden she tends to in her job as vice president of horticulture at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden. Her work has now been acknowledged with another recognition from her alma mater, Stephen F. Austin State University, where she recently received the Distinguished Alumni Award in Agriculture.

 

A 2005 graduate with a bachelor of science in agriculture and an emphasis in horticulture, Wegley has been interested in this field for many years. After graduation, she worked in horticultural retail until she was hired at the Dallas Arboretum in 2009. 

 

Wegley has lead the landscape design and planting selections for the entire garden for more than six years. This past year, she and Mark Bullitt, senior director of garden development, selected all the varieties of vegetables for the newest garden at the Dallas Arboretum, A Tasteful Place. This 3.5-acre edible garden teaches people what grows well in the North Texas climate, when to plant and how to harvest fruits, vegetables and herbs. In addition to the four signature potager gardens, which are working kitchen gardens, A Tasteful Place has a one-acre lagoon with aquatic plants that Wegley selected, a pavilion with a teaching and demonstration kitchen, an orchard, shaded porches and walkways.

 

Wegley said, “The movement toward growing and eating sustainable fresh, locally grown food has been evident by how many people have visited A Tasteful Place, attended gardening workshops, watched chef demonstrations and asked our gardeners questions.”

 

This was not the only award she has received. She has received one of the ‘40 under 40’ who are making a difference in horticulture in America today.

 

Wegley said, “I love the vast array of what you can do with horticulture. There’s so much to learn.” Her position gives her the perfect place to learn, especially as the Dallas Arboretum trials more than 5,000 cultivars annually. Before A Tasteful Place was open, Wegley and her Horticulture team trialed vegetables for nearly six years before they planted anything in the garden. The Dallas Arboretum is one of the few places in the region that has been trialing vegetables in a large-scale way. This type of learning helps the Horticulture staff and those who visit the garden learn what varieties grow best.

 

When she’s not working, Wegley tends to her own garden in Oak Cliff where she’s growing tomatoes, artichokes, soybeans and carrots. Whether it’s at home or work, she enjoys making her gardens grow.  

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WalkSTEM

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden held its very first walkSTEM tour, which was organized in collaboration with its founder, Dr. Koshi Dhingra. Dallas Arboretum Education teachers, Christine Dietz and Anna Sorelle, led guided explorations to help children and adults build an understanding of everyday connections to STEM-science, technology, engineering and math concepts.

 

On June 9 and 10 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Dallas Arboretum educators will lead walkSTEM tours through the garden starting at the Entry Plaza. Participants may also pick up a map for a self-guided experience at the information booth. The tour is free with paid garden admission.

 

Arboretum educators guided participants through four different areas of the garden where they encouraged them to explore the way in which math and science can be applied to learning about the world in a fun, interactive manner.  At the All American vegetable trial garden, they learned how different plants grow in the garden and estimated how much space a single plant needs to grow. In the Jonsson Color Garden, they looked for pollinators to see what types of flowers pollinators visited most often and observed the shapes and sizes of flowers that attracted these pollinators as well as the role color plays.  In A Woman’s Garden, they measured the tiles in the fountain, estimated the number of coins needed to cover the titles, and calculated their value. Finally, at Karen’s Gazebo, participants observed patterns, shapes, designs and repetition inherent in nature and design. 

 

At each station, educators asked questions to challenge their thinking and deductive skills. According to one parent, “This walk opened my eyes to the science and math all around me, especially in the Dallas Arboretum, which is truly a treasure in our city.”

 

For more information, visit www.dallasarboretum.org/walkSTEM.

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

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Dallas Arboretum Martha Stewart and Kaki Hopkins

Martha Stewart, the most famous name in gardening, entertaining and decorating, received the Dallas Arboretum’s Great Contributor to Art Award on May 11 at the Celebrating Martha and her 90th book Martha’s Flowers event at the garden. She signed copies and talked about her latest book, Martha’s Flowers: A Practical Guide to Growing, Gathering, and Enjoying, which features gardening advice developed over decades, along with more than 100 creative arrangements by Kevin Sharkey, her longtime friend and co-author.

The event also included an Invitational Fine Art Acquisitions opportunity where guests bid on stunning artwork, curated by Gail Sachson, from some of Dallas’ finest artists, with all proceeds benefiting the Dallas Arboretum.

After signing books, Stewart toured the Dallas Arboretum, including the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden, with President Mary Brinegar. Reverend Joshua Whitfield, pastoral administrator and rector of Saint Rita Catholic Community, gave the invocation.

Then guests enjoyed the delectable lunch, which featured recipes from Entertaining by Martha Stewart, her iconic entertaining guide that changed how hostesses thought about food and presentation. Prepared by Gil’s Elegant Catering, the menu included Chilled Vichyssoise, Escalope of Salmon with Sorrel Sauce served with Risotto, Haricots Verts and Carrots, Blackberry Mousse with Lavender and Lemon Tart with Rose Petals.

The centerpieces were inspired by arrangements from Martha’s Flowers and created by the following talented local floral artists:

  • John Holstead, PARC Floral and Events
  • Debby Jewesson, Branching Out Events
  • David Kimmel
  • Kristen Wolchik, Haute Floral

Alicia and Adam Rico of Bows & Arrows created additional gorgeous floral displays including an outside flower wall, popular with attendees taking photos in front of it, two inside floral walls and many colorful flowers artfully arranged on the stage.

As guests enjoyed their desserts, Dallas Arboretum Artscape Chairwoman Kaki Hopkins presented Martha Stewart with her award. Hopkins said, “Our honoree has taught us how to inject artistry into our everyday lives, enriching the living experience for ourselves and for those around us. It is the Arboretum’s extreme pleasure and honor to present the 2018 Artscape Great Contributor Award to an American entrepreneur, an icon of fine living, a best selling author, an artist of many disciplines, and a grower of flowers, Martha Stewart.”

Stewart thanked Hopkins and the Dallas Arboretum. “I love your beautiful arboretum. I know how much effort it takes to build such an amazing garden, so congratulations to Dallas. You are lucky to have such a place to gather and enjoy.”

The program concluded with a conversation with Stewart and Sharkey where they spoke about their latest book. Stewart’s father was an inspiration. “I’ve been growing flowers with my dad since I was 3.” She entered her first flower show when she was eight years old and won with her starburst orange lilies in a tall silver container.

Sharkey talked about living with flowers every day and encouraged people to plant trees and have fresh flowers for any occasion, not just special occasions.

Stewart talked about her various gardens, including the one in Seal Harbor, Maine, where David Rockefeller knocked on her door and welcomed her to the neighborhood.

Stewart concluded the afternoon with these encouraging words: “Teach your kids where food comes from…children don’t know that these days. I’m so happy to see the Children’s Garden at the Dallas Arboretum. Gardening gives pleasure, knowledge and appreciation for things you take for granted.”

A special thanks to Artscape sponsors, underwriters, hosts, patrons, artists and other silent auction donors.

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.   The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $9. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum. The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit dallasarboretum.org.

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Martha Stewart

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden’s Artscape Chairwoman, Kaki Hopkins, announced that the most famous name in gardening, entertaining and decorating, Martha Stewart, is the Great Contributor to Art Award honoree and speaker on May 11 at Rosine Hall to talk about her latest book. Just released, Martha’s Flowers: A Practical Guide to Growing, Gathering, and Enjoying features decades of Martha’s gardening advice, along with more than 100 creative arrangements by Kevin Sharkey, her longtime friend and colleague. A reception starts at 10 a.m. with book sales, signing and bidding for the Invitational Fine Art Auction silent auction, which will be donated by dozens of acclaimed artists and local Dallas notables. The luncheon begins at 12 noon.

WFAA Channel 8 anchor, Ron Corning, serves as emcee and moderates the conversation with Stewart and Sharkey. 

Hopkins said, “Martha Stewart has brought into millions of American homes a respect for artistry. She has inspired us to seek artistry in our everyday life—menu planning, entertaining, decorating for special days, cooking for special occasions and every day, table top design—among countless other lessons on living graciously and artfully. She has written 90 books on these subjects, so we can follow her lead. Her latest book extends her artistry into horticulture and arranging flowers. We are thrilled that she has chosen the Arboretum to announce this book on her passion for growing flowers and engaging the best of design in gardens and flower arrangements. As lovers of the Dallas Arboretum, we share that passion.”

According to Penguin Random House: “Martha Stewart’s lifelong love of flowers began at a young age, as she dug in and planted alongside her father in their family garden, growing healthy, beautiful blooms, every year. The indispensable lessons she learned then–and those she has since picked up from master gardeners–form the best practices she applies to her voluminous flower gardens today. This lifetime of wisdom, compiled in Martha’s Flowers, forms a must-have handbook for flower gardeners and enthusiasts of all skill levels.”

According to Martha from her book: “At present my biggest garden project is Cantitoe Farm, my 150-acre property in Katonah, about fifty miles north of New York City…I have planted masses of my favorite kinds of flowers: a giant bed of pink-colored peonies; a very large perennial garden filled with all of my favorite lilies, poppies, and irises, among hundreds of others; two long gardens filled with many kinds of lilac shrubs; and borders of hydrangeas, Japanese maple trees, clematis, shade plants, and tulip beds…The bouquets and arrangements in this book resulted from our [Kevin Sharkey’s and my] close planning and envisioning—and luck—in growing spectacular blooms that combine well with one another, or with foliage, to bedazzle a room or call one’s eyes to attention.”

Tables are $3,000, $5,000 and $10,000. Tickets are $500 and $1,000. Sponsorships are also available. For more information, contact Missy Whisler at mwhisler@dallasarboretum.org or 214.515.6688. Visit dallasarboretum.org for more details.

The Great Contributor to Art Award was designed and donated by Gary Lee Price, whose Great Contributors exhibition at the Dallas Arboretum in 2016 was the inspiration for the award’s name.  Craig Hall, entrepreneur, businessman and lifelong art collector, received the inaugural Great Contributor to Art award in 2017.

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

 

Excerpted from Martha's Flowers by Martha Stewart and Kevin Sharkey. Copyright © 2018 by Martha Stewart with Kevin Sharkey. All rights reserved.

 

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Shelton Hopkins, Kaki Hopkins, J. Mark Wolf

An elegant Artscape kickoff reception was held on March 13 at a private Highland Park residence.  Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden Artscape Chair Kaki Hopkins gave some exciting updates about this year’s Artscape taking place April 28-29 where 96 professional artists from around the country will showcase their artwork in the garden. A distinguished jury of art professionals selected these artists from a competitive group of a record-breaking number of applicants.

 

Other Artscape happenings include Galleries at the DeGolyer with local top galleries showcasing and selling their paintings and sculpture (donating 20% of their sales to the Arboretum); a University Zone with regional universities showing and selling their art; Dallas County Community College District providing art demonstrations; continual live musical entertainment on stage with radio and TV personalities serving as emcees; returning and new food concessions and wine and beer flights and packaged food for sale.

 

“It’s the perfect place to spend the weekend strolling through the gardens and shopping for artwork from these artists who are among the best in their fields of painting, drawing, sculpture, woodwork, jewelry making, textiles and more,” said Hopkins.

 

Admission is free for paid garden guests. Visit dallasarboretum.org for more details.

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Vaux-le-Vicomte

On March 21 at 11 a.m. at Rosine Hall, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden invites the community to hear Alexandre de Vogüé speak about his family’s 17th century chateau Vaux-le-Vicomte, particularly the pioneering efforts of André Le Nôtre in designing its famous gardens. de Vogüé and his brothers, Jean-Charles de Vogüé and Ascanio de Vogüé, who now manage their ancestral estate, located just outside Paris, France, have also written a book, A Day at Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte, which will be available for purchase and signing after the speech. The talk is free to paid garden guests, although reservations are encouraged by contacting Mayra Salazar at 214-515-6677 or via email at msalazar@dallasarboretum.org.

 

Alexandre de Vogüé will give insight into the fascinating history of the estate as well as the modern day challenges involved in managing the largest private property in France, which is also listed as a historic monument. Together with his brothers, the fifth generation to own the family estate, he oversees an ongoing and ambitious restoration program, balancing attention to historic preservation and cultural heritage.

 

Vaux-le-Vicomte’s history began in 1641 when Finance Minister Nicolas Fouquet bought the estate and engaged three of the most famous artists of Grand Siècle: architect Louis Le Vau, painter Charles de Brun and landscape designer André Le Nôtre to transform it into a magnificent residence. The estate soon became the model that inspired Europe for more than a century, impressing even Louis XIV who engaged the same artists to build the château de Versailles. In 1875, a wealthy French industrialist named Alfred Sommier purchased the estate in an auction and undertook renovations to restore it. In 1968, Patrice de Vogüé, Sommier’s great grandson, opened the château to the public to raise funds to preserve the property. Now Patrice’s sons are continuing to preserve the splendor of Vaux-le-Vicomte.

 

A significant feature of the estate is the illustrious garden designed by Le Nôtre. Perhaps the leading landscape designer of all time, Le Nôtre’s work includes Versailles, Chantilly and the Tuileries.

 

Mary Brinegar, Dallas Arboretum president and CEO, said, “We are fortunate to have one of the world's most significant estate owners speak with us, and we invite the public to join us. Some feel the garden design of Vaux-le-Vicomte may be among Le Nôtre’s best. We will hear how this landscape architect’s classic work is evidenced today at the de Vogue family’s lovely château."

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.   The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $9. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum. The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visit dallasarboretum.org.

 

                                             

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Vegetables photo credit: Dallas Arboretum

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden announces that the Founders Garden Club of Dallas will present a series of workshops at the garden, with the first one being “Everything You Wanted to Know About Vegetable Gardening” on Saturday, March 10 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Rosine Hall. This session is free to those with paid garden admission.

 

Founders Garden Club of Dallas, a Garden Club of America member, is sponsoring this day to help garden guests learn the essentials of planning, preparation, planting, growing and harvesting fresh vegetables – both in a garden plot or containers. 

 

Current club President Barbara Hunt Crow said, “With spring upon us, people become inspired to garden and grow. One goal of Founders is to be able to sponsor informative workshops, and the Dallas Arboretum is the perfect partner to help make it happen.”

 

Dallas Arboretum’s Vice President of Horticulture Jenny Wegley, one of the featured speakers for the workshop, will provide information on:

  • Preparation of the garden space
  • Vegetable selection
  • Seeding or planting
  • Plant needs
  • Keeping produce insect- and disease-free
  • Harvesting.

 

After guests attend this informative workshop, they can tour the Dallas Arboretum’s latest garden, A Tasteful Place, a new 3.5-acre, $12 million edible display garden that showcases the best gardening practices with fruit, herbs and vegetables. The Potager Gardens, which translate as an ornamental kitchen garden, are a signature element of the development with in-season vegetables, herbs and flowers, planted ornamentally and interspersed with flowers to attract pollinators and beneficial insects.  Of the four potagers, one is named for the late Marilyn R. Corrigan and the other for her daughter, Catherine A. Corrigan, a Founders Garden Club member.

 

For more information on the March 10th event, contact Mayra Salazar at 214-515-6677 or via email at msalazar@dallasarboretum.org

 

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The Arboretum is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 3-12 and free for Arboretum members and children two and under. On-site parking is $15 or $9, if purchased in advance online. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department. WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum.  

 

 

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Dallas Arboretum photo credit: Dallas Arboretum

With freezing weather approaching, it is important to take precautions to ensure your plants are protected from extreme weather conditions.  Following a few simple steps prescribed by Dave Forehand, Dallas Arboretum vice president of gardens, will enable your plants to survive the sometimes-harsh North Texas cold spells. 

Water plants before freeze:

First, water plants before a freeze, particularly the plant root zone. Water acts like a blanket insulating the roots. This makes the plant stronger against a freeze. When plant cells are full of water, they are less likely to be subject to frost damage. If possible, water a day or two before a freeze and make sure to water the entire root zone of the plant. This is especially important in newly planted trees and shrubs. Try watering early in the day so plants have time to absorb water before a freeze. If at all possible, avoid watering the foliage. If you have an irrigation system, hand watering might be the best option for certain locations. Keeping water off the foliage prevents the formation of ice on leaf material which can cause breaks and more damage.

Cover cold sensitive plants:

Cover them with blankets, sheets or towels. Do not use plastic because it is not breathable and will freeze to the plants causing damage. When daytime temperatures rise above freezing, it is important to remove the cover because, if left under cover all day, temperatures under the blankets can get too warm, damaging the plants and waking them from dormancy. 

If possible, use frost cloth:

Frost cloth acts as a blanket and helps trap heat. Make sure that you secure the cloth entirely around the plant and tighten to the soil using fabric pins or bricks (anything that will hold it down firmly will work). Frost cloth is made from a product that “breathes,” and this cloth helps against burn caused by other materials. Purchase frost cloth months in advance, if possible. When the threat of a freeze is coming, frost cloth sells out quickly. Do not use frost cloth when there is a chance of snow. Otherwise, it will cause more damage breaking plants from the weight of the snow.

Take care of plants constantly:

The healthier your plants are, the more prone they are to handle stress. Proper water and maintenance throughout the growing season will help in the winter months. It is also important to select the right plant for your area.  Check to make sure that the plant material you select is appropriate for your location. Check out USDA plant hardiness zone map to see what zone you live in. This information will help you purchase the best plant material for your zone.

Move plants inside, especially with high winds:

When high winds are a threat, it is a good idea to move potted plants into a shed or garage. Although plants don’t feel wind-chill, cold winds quickly dry them out.  Most plants can survive upper 30-degree temperatures easily in a shed or garage because these areas usually don’t drop below freezing until severe weather in February. 

For more plant tips, visit www.dallasarboretum.org.