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Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake is excited to be the official wellness partner of YMCA at White Rock and offer a series of nutrition classes to the east Dallas area. Together, we are committed to helping people live longer, healthier lives by providing programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body for all. We are proud to collaborate with such a strong organization that shares our passion for health, wellness and strengthening our community, and look forward partnering with the YMCA to help improve the well-being of people living in the White Rock Lake area.

As part of this initiative, Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake and YMCA at White Rock are co-sponsoring a series of nutrition classes every other month. With such timely topics as healthy eating on a budget during the recent inaugural class, other seminars will focus on stop the madness of fad diets and banishing boredom with a healthy lunch. All classes are offered as part of the hospital’s Healthy Eating for Healthy Living nutrition series and provided free of charge to members of the community at the current YMCA at White Rock on Gaston Avenue. 

The partnership also will include an 800-square-foot health and wellness center located within the new 37,000 square-foot YMCA facility that is scheduled for completion in fall of 2014. The new YMCA will be located at Gaston Avenue and Loving Avenue, on the site of the former Trinity Lutheran Church. The hospital will provide wellness services in two exam rooms, as well as free health screenings and health seminars focused on issues such as weight loss, diabetes and prenatal care. Membership at the YMCA is not required to attend the classes or access wellness services. For more information about the nutrition classes, call 866-764-3627, or visit the hospital’s website at DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/nutritionseries.

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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Save enough pennies and you have a dime. Save enough dimes and you have a dollar. Save enough dollars and, well, get what you have always wanted. It may take some time for the big ticket items, but if you work hard and start saving early, you could achieve your goal. Staying healthy can work the same way. By doing the little things, you could live a longer, healthier life.

Here are a few tips so you can reap the rewards of avoiding chronic illnesses and premature death.

  • Start moving. Regular exercise can help prevent and control both high blood pressure and diabetes, and maintain healthy cholesterol levels.
  • Eat right. Take extra helpings of fruits, vegetables and whole grains while passing on the deep-fried fast foods, bakery products, and packaged snack items.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking is associated with heart disease, cancer and lung disease.
  • Drink responsibly. Moderate drinking of no more than two drinks per day for men or one for women is OK, but don’t overdo it.
  • Stay safe. Wear the proper protective gear when participating in sports and fasten your seat belt when riding in or driving a car.
  • Learn about your family’s health history. Certain health conditions can be passed on from one generation to the next.
  • Get regular checkups. Some diseases and conditions do not cause symptoms, so it is important to get screened before signs appear.
  • Check your numbers. Monitoring blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure and body mass index can help catch underlying health problems early. 

By making smart lifestyle choices every day, you can fill up your piggy bank and stay healthy well into your golden years. For more information about living healthy, visit the free, online health library on the Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake website at DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/HealthySecrets.

Photo credit: Hemera/Thinkstock

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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From eyelid primer and eyeshadow to eyeliner and mascara, there are plenty of opportunities for bacteria to catch a free ride on any of the makeup products used around your eyes. That’s because eyelashes naturally have bacteria on them. Once a makeup brush is used on the eyelash or eyelid, the brush is contaminated. Eventually, the contaminated brush can cause a buildup of bacteria in the makeup container itself and increase the risk of an eye infection or allergic reaction each time the product is used. 

Although most makeup has a relatively long shelf life, they can be contaminated with bacteria after only one use. As a result, it’s a good idea to keep track of how long products such as mascara or eyeliners have been used and change them about every three to four months to reduce the risk of infection. Some other ways to safely use eye cosmetics include:

  • Avoid sharing makeup to limit exposure to infections.
  • Stop using eye products immediately if they cause irritation.
  • Washing your hands before applying eye makeup.
  • Using only clean cosmetic tools.
  • Not storing cosmetics at temperatures above 85 degrees Fahrenheit (29 degrees Celsius).
  • Waiting until an eye infection has healed to use cosmetics.
  • Being especially careful about using eye makeup if you have allergies.
  • Removing eye cosmetics gently to avoid scratching the eyeball or other sensitive area around the eye.
  • Making sure eyeliner pencils are sufficiently sharpened so the wood casing doesn’t scratch the eyelid.
  • Not trying to put on eye makeup while in a moving vehicle or using a sharp object to separate mascara-clumped eyelashes. 

For more tips about preventing serious eye conditions caused by old makeup, visit the free, online health library on the Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake website at DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/OldMakeup.


Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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Needing a convenient after-hour option for minor emergencies? Did you just feel a cough coming and your doctor’s office is closed? Did your child just fall while playing in the backyard after school? The Urgent Care by Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake is a good option for patients who do not require the high level of care provided in an emergency room, but instead have a minor emergency, such as a cut that requires stitches, sprained ankle, or other illnesses that are not life-threatening. The Center is a convenient alternative when other primary care clinics are closed.

Urgent Care by Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake is staffed by physicians and specially trained nurses. It is equipped to handle a wide range of minor emergencies, such as sinusitis, bronchitis, sore throat, ear and eye infections, urinary tract infection, broken bones, migraines, colds, insect bites, stomach flu, or sports related injuries. On-site laboratory services and X-rays also are available, as well as school physicals. No appointments are necessary and patients are seen on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The new urgent care center is located at 9540 Garland Road, Suite C408, on the southwest corner in Casa Linda Plaza in the space that formerly was BLOCKBUSTER. The facility offers Urgent Care bundled pricing and is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on weekends from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Most insurance plans accepted. For more information about the Center, visit DoctorsHospitalUrgentCare.com.

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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Catherine de Medici is generally credited, or some might say blamed, for wearing the first pair of high heel shoes when she became engaged to the Duke of Orleans in 1533 because she felt self-conscious about her diminutive stature. High heels eventually became a sign of higher social status and wealth, and today high heels are available in a wide selection of shapes, styles and heights. Unfortunately, high heels — those shoes with a heel two inches or higher — are one of the leading reasons why women have foot problems. 

Wearing high heels for an extended period of time can make the toes bend into an unnatural position and redistribute weight incorrectly. As a result, women could experience a number of different ailments, including ingrown toenails, nerve damage and bunions. High heels also may contribute to osteoarthritis in the knee, plantar fasciitis, sciatica, shortened calf and back muscles that can cause muscle spasms, and an overarched back that puts strain on the knees, hips and lower back.

But don’t worry — you can still make a fashion statement in heels as long as you follow a few easy tips. Choose shoes with lower heels — an inch and a half or less — that have a wide heel base. Make sure shoes are the correct size and select ones with soft insoles that can reduce the impact on your knees. If you’re going to slip on a pair of heels, wear them on days when you don’t have to stand or walk as much, and switch them out with athletic or walking shoes when commuting to and from work.

To learn more about how to take care of your feet, take the quick, online foot health quiz on the Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake website at DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/FootHealthQuiz.

Photo credit: iStock/Thinkstock

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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If you are a woman over 40, you may have a lot of questions about menopause. When does menopause start? How long will I experience symptoms? Can symptoms be treated? Can I still get pregnant when going through menopause? Will menopause affect my physical appearance? Your doctor will be able to answer these questions and help you best manage menopause symptoms to ensure your health both today and as you experience this natural stage of life. 

All women will experience menopause. However, each person may have different symptoms. The average age for this “change of life” is 51, but it usually occurs any time between the age of 40 and 55. Common symptoms may include changes in periods (such as being heavier or lighter, and shorter or longer in duration or time in between cycles), hot flashes, night sweats, difficulty sleeping, and moodiness. Each woman’s menopause experience will be unique. Menopause itself does not require treatment, but if you find some symptoms to be bothersome, you should talk with your doctor about how to relieve your discomfort.

You may notice several changes in your body as you go through menopause, such as weight gain around your waist, increase in fatty tissue, loss of muscle mass, reduced breast size, and thinning and loss of elasticity in the skin. Fortunately, you can take steps to feel better about yourself and stay healthy after menopause. Don’t smoke, eat a healthy diet that includes enough calcium and vitamin D, maintain a healthy weight, and exercise regularly.

Women today will live more than one-third of their lives after menopause. That’s why it’s important to make lifestyle changes that will allow you to get the most out of life. Test your knowledge of menopause by taking a quick, online menopause quiz on our website at DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/MenopauseQuiz.

Photo credit: iStock/Thinkstock

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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Thanksgiving can be a real challenge for anyone trying to reign in their appetite or watch their weight with all that mouth-watering turkey, delicious green bean casserole, creamy mashed potatoes, and Grandma’s special pumpkin pie. You might feel like you’re gaining five pounds just thinking about it.

Here are a few tips to help you navigate the buffet table so you can enjoy the festivities without sabotaging your diet.

  • Eat first. Have a nutritious breakfast or lunch to curb your cravings during the Thanksgiving meal.
  • Make substitutions. Modify traditional recipes to cut calories and fat by using chicken broth or fat-free yogurt instead of cream in dips and mashed potatoes.
  • Switch plates. Leave the large 10-inch dinner plate on the table and switch to a more calorie-friendly 8-inch plate so you’ll eat less without even thinking about it.
  • Choose wisely. Just because certain dishes are offered doesn’t mean you have to sample every one. Look over the entire buffet before making your selections.
  • Slow down. Savor and chew every bite thoroughly so you can enjoy your meal and be satisfied with one plate of food.
  • Stay put. Avoid going back for second helpings and limit portion sizes.
  • Drink responsibly. Limit alcoholic consumption since calories from alcohol can add up fast and trigger cravings for high-calorie foods.
  • Keep moving. Go for a walk after the main course and have dessert later. 

If you are eating out for your Thanksgiving meal, ask for food that is steamed, grilled or broiled rather than fried or sautéed. Request that sauces and dressing be served on the side, and watch out for super-sized portions that tempt you to eat too much.

For some tips on how to produce a festive meal you will be happy to serve on Thanksgiving Day, visit DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/Thanksgiving.

Photo credit: Fuse/Thinkstock

 

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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It’s easier to get where you want to go when you have directions. Staying on the right track for good health includes eating right, exercising and not smoking. But you might unknowingly be going in the wrong direction if you have pre-diabetes. That’s because symptoms of this condition may develop so gradually, if at all, that most people are not aware they have it.

It’s important to know if you have pre-diabetes because it is often the precursor to type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, pre-diabetes can be diagnosed using either the fasting plasma glucose test or oral glucose tolerance test, and the progression to diabetes can be delayed or reversed through weight loss, exercise and medication. The American Diabetes Association recommends testing for people who are over the age of 45 or overweight, have high blood pressure or a first-degree relative with diabetes, had gestational diabetes or delivered a baby weighing more than nine pounds, or are African American, Latino, Asian, Native American or Pacific Islander. If diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you should be checked for type 2 diabetes every one to two years. 

Studies have shown that a modest weight loss of seven percent of total body weight coupled with 30-minute daily moderate exercise five days a week can delay or prevent the onset of diabetes. Blood glucose levels could even return to normal in some cases. A medication called metformin (Glucophage) also may be effective in delaying the onset of diabetes, but not to the extent of diet and exercise. 

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that requires treatment because studies have shown it may cause some long-term damage to the heart and circulatory system. To learn more about pre-diabetes, take the free, online pre-diabetes risk assessment available on the Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake website at DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/PrediabetesQuiz

Photo courtesy: iStock/Thinkstock

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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The real dangers of Halloween are not from ghosts and goblins, but from falls and injuries that can steal the fun from what should be a memorable evening for children. Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake offers the following tips to help keep all the little wizards, pirates and princesses safe during the festivities.

Choose the right costume. Check to make certain the material is flame retardant and that your child’s vision won’t be obscured by any part of the costume. Make sure the costume isn’t too long to prevent tripping. If your child is wearing a hat, check to see that it won’t slip down over the eyes. Remember to add something reflective on your child’s clothing or have them carry a flashlight.

Stay together. Younger children should always have a responsible adult or older teenager with them while they trick or treat. A group of three or more is much safer than one. You may want to find an alternative to door-to-door trick or treating such as going to a mall or community event, or hosting a special Halloween party for your children and their friends.

Carve the pumpkin yourself. Children often want to help carve the jack-o-lantern, but little fingers and sharp objects don’t mix. Let your children draw the face on the pumpkin while you handle the carving. Your children may enjoy cleaning out the pumpkin and saving the seeds to bake for a snack.

Put safety first. Watch out for traffic, stay on the sidewalks and cross only at intersections. Only visit the houses of people you know and where an outside light is on. Check your child’s candy before they eat it. Throw away any open packages or homemade treats.

To learn more about how to have a hazard-free Halloween, visit DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/SafeHalloween.

Photo credit: Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com

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Taking a nap doesn’t have to be as hard for you as it was for Goldilocks. One bed was too hard, another too soft and the third was just right. But she didn’t get to sleep for long before Papa Bear woke her up. Getting the most bang for your buck by catching a few quick Zzzzzs just depends on length of time, sleeping position and time of day.

The brain goes through several cycles about every 90 to 120 minutes during sleep. Non-rapid eye movement sleep is broken down into stage one and two, which are recognized as light and intermediate, followed by slow-wave sleep, which is the deepest type of sleep that can cause grogginess after waking up. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is typically associated with dreaming.

A quick 10- to 20-minute power nap is usually the best way to boost alertness so you can get back to work. Snoozing for 60-minutes that includes slow-wave sleep can help with cognitive memory processing, such as remembering people, places, and things, but it could leave you a bit groggy. The 90-minute nap with REM sleep can aide in creativity and build procedural memory, like learning how to ride a bicycle.

Ideally, naps should be taken between 1 and 4 p.m. because napping any later could interfere with nighttime sleep. If you want to wake up more alert after a short nap, try drinking a caffeinated beverage before sleeping — the caffeine should lessen that after-nap groggy feeling. Also, try to snooze partially upright because not lying totally flat can help you avoid falling into a deeper sleep.

The Sleep Center of Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake provides treatment designed to manage problems that prevent you from getting a good night’s rest. For more information, visit DoctorsHospitalDallas.com/SleepCenter.

Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake

9400 Poppy Drive
Dallas, TX 75218

214-324-6100
www.doctorshospitaldallas.com