iReporter
 

The air is getting warmer, the days are getting longer and spring is almost here. However, with the arrival of spring also comes tornado season and the possibility of other severe weather.

Many states in the Southwest have been hit hard by tornadoes recently. Other potential dangers include thunderstorms and flash flooding.

“Severe weather can strike when you least expect it,” says Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). “Remember, no matter where you live, it’s important to listen to NOAA Weather Radio and local news and to monitor for severe weather updates and warnings and follow instructions of state and local officials.”

FEMA encourages families to have an emergency plan ready in case of a disaster and to also have an emergency supply kit at home and in the car. In case of severe weather, keep these safety tips in mind:

  • Continue to monitor the radio or television for emergency information
  • Injury may occur when people walk among disaster debris and enter damaged buildings. Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves and gloves when working with debris
  • Mobile homes offer little protection from tornadoes and should be abandoned. Residents of mobile homes must plan in advance and identify safe shelter in a nearby building
  • If a flood is a possibility in the area, be aware that flash flooding can occur. If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately to higher ground.
  • Do not touch downed power lines or objects in contact with downed lines. Report downed power lines and electrical hazards to the police
  • After a disaster, be aware of possible structural, electrical or gas-leak hazards in your home. Contact your local city building inspectors for information on structural safety codes and standards